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Course Guide

Use the following guide to complete the requirements for this course.

Course Assignments

The course contains four types of assignments: Tweet OR Stump, Skills Log, WhizQuizes, and Projects totaling 100 points.

Special Note: If you're taking two of the four cluster courses, you have some options related to the Tweet OR Stump and Skills Log assignments. Be sure to review these options.

The Tweet OR Stump (8 points) assignment provides two options. The Tweet option involves sharing favorite new information sources with your peers and the world through Twitter. The Stump option involves sharing sample problems and solutions called Scenario Stumpers in a Facebook group.
If you're taking two of the courses, you need to do Tweets for one course and Stumps for the other.

The Skills Log (24 points) requires you to apply your course readings to specific situations. You'll complete these short, practical assignments during the semester and submit them at the end of the course.
If you're taking two of the courses, you must do the Skills Log for one of the two courses.
For the other course, create an annotated list of resources you could use as a subject area librarian. Your list must include at least four materials from each of the eleven course sections for a total of at least 50 resources. You can decide whether you want it to be a general list or focus on a particular sub-discipline. This is due the same time as the Skills Log.

The four WhizQuizes (5 points each; total of 20 points) will check to ensure that you can demonstrate skills related to the discipline focus of the course. You can refer to the course readings when completing these open-book quizzes.
If you're taking two of the courses, you must do the WhizQuizes for one of the two courses.
For the other course, this is your chance to dive into an interest area and do your own thing. Since this is worth 20 points, it should be substantial. You might want to create a Weebly website focusing on a particular subdiscipline, create instructional materials to help users access information in a specialty databases, create an orientation handbook for students or faculty in a subdiscipline, build a marketing plan focus encouraging use of subject-area resources, or interview multiple subject-matter librarians and write about the unique attributes and skills needed for this type of work... be creative. You can work in any format you wish. The key is exploring subject matter resources and/or librarianship. This project is due when the last WhizQuiz is due at the end of the semester. Submit this assignment directly to Dr. Lamb through email and note that it's intended to replace the WhizQuiz requirement.

The four Theory-to-Practice Projects (12 points each; total of 48 points) assignments will help you apply what you've learned to real-world library situations. You will be posting your assignment in the discussion area of Canvas, as well as, reacting to the work of your peers. To be successful, complete the required readings related to the assignment before trying to complete the project.

Courses Study Materials

Each person approaches the course in a different way depending on his or her personal and professional interests and experiences. Rather than dictating all of the required readings, this course provides flexibility by allowing you to choose areas where you'd like to explore in-depth.

try itWoven into the required online course readings, you'll find required articles indicated with a blue book icon shown on the left. Read them for the general concepts they address. You don't need to read every word of every article and in many cases, you'll be directed to SKIM rather than read. However they are often useful in completing the assignments so don't skip them!

try itIn some cases, a video will be provided. Rather an a book icon, look for the blue video icon (right).

You'll also find additional resources at the bottom of each course page. It's up to you to decide whether these additional resources will be useful for your understanding. They can be very useful in identifying ideas to share in the course assignments.

try itRather than simply reading the materials on each page, be sure to TRY IT! Throughout the course readings, you'll find short activities that will help you apply the ideas you're learning. These activities aren't graded and don't need to be turned in, however they are important for your learning. They're the types of activities we would be doing in a face-to-face class. Instead, it's your job to work your way through these activities independently. Look for the Try It! icon (left) on the left in light green boxes for TRY IT! activities. Many of these activities have been woven into the formal assignments.

Course Guide

You can find the specific course readings for each week in this guide. They are also found in the Course Calendar along with due dates for readings and activity assignments.

Introduce Yourself (0 Points, required)
Introduce yourself to the class in Canvas.
Then, share your specific interests in this discipline. Are you personally interested, professionally interested, or both? How does this course connect with your career aspirations?

Complete the Introduce Yourself assignment.


Tweet or Stump
Choose one of the following two options.
The grade for this assignment won't be posted until the end of the semester after all posts/replies have been made.

Special Note: If you're taking two of the courses, you need to do Tweets for one course and Stumps for the other.

Tweet or Stump Option 1: Twitter Assignment (8 Points total)
Many libraries use Twitter as a way to share new information sources, services, and ideas of interest to users. We’ll be using Twitter in this course to share cool information sources that you find. If you wish, you can stick to the same sub-discipline or topic, however it isn’t necessary. Just avoid duplication with your other assignments.

I’ve created a Twitter account for this course. It can be found at https://twitter.com/LIScluster. We’ll follow each other and I’ll retweet your tweets so they’ll all be shown on the class Twitter page.

Requirement. You need to post 8 Tweets and 4 replies to peer Tweets sometime during the semester. The Tweets and replies can be made any time, however they should not all be posted at the end of the semester or there will be a penalty. The key to effective tweeting is an ongoing relationship with your readers. If all your postings are bunched together at the end of the semester, they’re unlike to be read. Plan on about 1 per week to keep on track. Half are required at midterm and the other half at the end of the semester. Although your points will be awarded at the end of the semester, I’ll let you know if I have concerns about your postings during the semester. A total of 8 points are possible. You will lose 1 point if the Tweets aren’t completed within the firm deadlines.

Reflection. When you’ve posted all your tweets and replies, you need to write a short reflection about the experience. Did you find the experience useful? Did you learn anything new? What are the pros and cons of using twitter in the library setting? Post this reflection as a REPLY in the discussion area to your initial posting where you shared your Twitter information.

Checklist
8 High-Quality Postings (5 Points)
4 High-Quality Replies (2 Points)
Reflection (1 Point)

Getting Started. Go to Twitter at http://twitter.com.
If you’re already a Twitter user, it’s fine to use your existing account if your wish.
If you’re new to Twitter, choose the “New to Twitter? Sign Up” option.
Create a Twitter account using your IUPUI email account, your personal account, or get a gmail account just of the activity. You can use any name and username you wish in Twitter.

Following. Everyone should post their “real name”, Twitter name, and Twitter username in the Canvas discussion area when your account is ready to go. I’ll FOLLOW you in Twitter. You’ll also want to FOLLOW ME at https://twitter.com/LIScluster. You can choose how many of your peers you want to follow.

Posting. When you’re ready to post, go to https://twitter.com/LIScluster and click “Tweet to LIScluster”. Or click the Tweet icon and type @LIScluster followed by your message. The Tweets must be fewer than 140 characters. URLs will be shortened automatically. Or, you can use a shortened URL using a tool like https://goo.gl/.

Posts should include an interesting, unusual, timely, or just plain cool information source and why it might be useful to library users. Sharing a quality review you find of a great resource is an easy and effective approach. You won’t have room for a formal citation, but you need to provide enough information so people can find the source easily. A link is the best approach. Here’s an example:

@LIScluster http://visuwords.com/ is a free, online visual dictionary and thesaurus useful for locating related words for searching.

@LIScluster The Encyclopedia of the Mind takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of cognition. Review at http://goo.gl/rni1CW


Replying. Below a posting, you’ll see a reply arrow. Click this and you can reply to the Tweet.

Replies should be more than “that’s cool”. You should add an example of how it might be used, information you found when you explored the source, a way it could be used to address a reference question, a related information source, or an idea about how it might be used across disciplines to solve a problem. Here’s an example of a reply to the previous post:

@LIScluster VisualThesaurus at http://visualthesaurus.com/ from Thinkmap is a subscription service similar to Visuwords, but more powerful.

@LIScluster Encyclopedia of the Mind was an ALA-RUSA 2014 Reference Source winner. Check out the list at http://t.co/ouaIdGUR1E.


Getting Help. For help using Twitter, go to https://support.twitter.com/.

Tweet or Stump Option 2: Scenario Stumpers
Many libraries use Facebook as a way to share new information sources, services, and ideas of interest to users. We’ll be using Facebook in this course to share information source questions and answers called "Scenario Stumpers".

Requirement. You need to make 8 postings and 4 replies to peer postings sometime during the semester. The postings and replies can be made any time, however they should not all be posted at the end of the semester or there will be a penalty. The key to effective use of social media is an ongoing relationship with your readers. If all your postings are bunched together at the end of the semester, they’re unlike to be read. Plan on about 1 per week to keep on track. Half are required at midterm and the other half at the end of the semester. Although your points will be awarded at the end of the semester, I’ll let you know if I have concerns about your postings during the semester. A total of 8 points are possible. You will lose 1 point if the postings aren’t completed within the firm deadlines.

Reflection. When you’ve posted all your postings and replies, you need to write a short reflection about the experience. Did you find the experience useful? Did you learn anything new? What are the pros and cons of using Facebook in the library setting? Post this reflection in the discussion area of Canvas.

Checklist
8 High-Quality Postings (5 Points)
4 High-Quality Replies (2 Points)
Reflection (1 Point)

Getting Started. Create a Facebook account if you don't already have one. If you don't want a permanent account, then create an account using your IUPUI email address. You don't need to provide any personal information, just your first inital and last name so your classmates can identify you.

Posting. When you’re ready to post, go to the LISCluster Facebook group.
In the upper right corner of the page, click JOIN GROUP. You'll need to be approved. If you aren't approved right away, email me and I'll get you approved right away.
Enter your posting where it says WRITE SOMETHING... You can also add an image if you wish.

You will be posting "Scenario Stumpers" similar to those you see woven into the course materials. The information source revealed in the stumper should not be something that appears on the results page of a Google search. In other words if a Google search can answer the question, it's NOT a stumper. Feel free to use information sources you discover during your weekly readings, or others that you discover on your own. They don't need to be answers to questions. Instead, they can be possible solutions to problems or suggestions to help the library user. Below is an example.

The Problem... I use biodiesel in my truck. I know the local areas where it's available. However, I'd like an easy way to locate biodiesel when I'm traveling. Ideas?
The Suggestion... The Alternative Fueling Station Locator by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is an easy-to-use mobile app for locating fueling stations for vehicles running on electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, E85, and hydrogen. Download the app.
The Bottom Line... increasingly mobile apps are a quick, portable way to locate information.


Replying. Below a Facebook posting, you’ll see a WRITE A COMMENT area. Click this and you can reply to the posting.

Replies should be more than “that’s cool”. You should add an example of another way the source could be used, information you found when you explored the source, a way it could be used to address a related reference question, a related information source, or an idea about how it might be used across disciplines to solve a problem. Feel free to make a connection across disciplines if you see a connection. Here’s an example of a reply to the previous post:

Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biorefining is a journal from the Society of Chemical Industry. It's available through John Wiley & Sons. Available through IUPUI. It provides lots of information about the science of this industry.

Starting Points

Read the Starting Points page and watch video. This page provides a general introduction to information sources and professional connections.
Read Science and Technology: Starting Points. This page focuses on materials specific to the area of science and technology.

Complete Skills Log: Starting Points.

Skills Log (24 points)
These short answer activities will help you practice the concepts represented in the course readings.

I've provided a word processing document containing the activities. Simply complete the activities as you work your way through the course materials.

To download the activities, go to Skills Log.

At the end of the semester, submit this document to the Assignments area of Canvas.


Special Note: If you're taking two of the courses, you must do the Skills Log for one of the two courses.
For the other course, create an annotated list of resources you could use as a subject area librarian. Your list must include at least four materials from each of the eleven course sections for a total of at least 50 resources. You can decide whether you want it to be a general list or focus on a particular sub-discipline. This is due the same time as the Skills Log
.

Information Seekers

Read Info Seekers page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Info Seekers.

Post Tweet or Stump 1.
Complete Skills Log: Information Seekers.

Research Guides

Read Research Guides page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Research Guides.

Post Tweet or Stump 2.
Complete Skills Log: Research Guides.
Go to Canvas and take WhizQuiz 1.

WhizQuizes (5 Points each; 20 Points total)
The four, five point WhizQuizes are intended to check your understanding of the course materials and readings.

The multiple choice questions will be directly related to the course readings, so no additional studying is required for the activity.

The quizzes are not timed. You can leave and come back later if neccessary.

These multiple choice exams can be found and taken in the Quizzes area of Canvas. The results will be automatically recorded in the Canvas Grades area.

Special Note: If you're taking two of the courses, you must do the WhizQuizes for one of the two courses.
For the other course, this is your chance to dive into an interest area and do your own thing. Since this is worth 20 points, it should be substantial. You might want to create a Weebly website focusing on a particular subdiscipline, create instructional materials to help users access information in a specialty databases, create an orientation handbook for students or faculty in a subdiscipline, build a marketing plan focus encouraging use of subject-area resources, or interview multiple subject-matter librarians and write about the unique attributes and skills needed for this type of work... be creative. You can work in any format you wish. The key is exploring subject matter resources and/or librarianship. This project is due when the last WhizQuiz is due at the end of the semester. Submit this assignment directly to Dr. Lamb through email and note that it's intended to replace the WhizQuiz requirement.

Reference Sources

Read Reference Sources page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Reference Sources.

Post Tweet or Stump 3.
Complete Skills Log: Reference Sources.

Project 1: You and Your Information Seekers (12 Points)
Use the following guidelines to complete Project 1.

Step 1: Science Librarianship. Explore professional associations (e.g., Medical Library Association), journals (e.g., Science & Technology Libraries), blogs, websites, social media, and other resources associated with a specific area of science librarianship. Be sure to go beyond the materials in the course.
Create an annotated quick-reference list including URLs of a dozen resources you think will be useful as you dig deeper into this area of librarianship. Be specific and provide examples. For instance, rather than simply listing ALA or ACRL, describe a division or section within these organizations and what they do. If you're a school or public librarian, it's fine to incorporate academic area librarianship materials. However see if you can find a blog or model library that reflects your interest such as home health care or gardening in a public library.
Be sure to include the title/name, URL, and a brief description of each.
Step 2: The Discipline and the Professionals. Define a discipline or subdiscipline. Describe the professionals, students, or hobbyists who might be interested in this area. Describe at least a dozen key topics, issues, ideas, or approaches. What are the big questions facing this area? List at least one national, professional organization associated with this area. What is its mission? Who are the members? Discuss what elements of the professional website might be useful to librarians assisting information seekers. What are the major universities that do research in this area? Or, what are the companies, non-profits, or related groups that focus on this discipline?
Step 3: The Information Seekers and Their Behavior. Create a broad overview of information seekers in this discipline. What are their common behaviors? Then, create three personas (1-2 page biographical sketches of a single, potential information seeker) in your discipline. Who are these people? What are they like as an information seekers? Cite and use at least SIX professional journal research articles to support the traits and/or behaviors of these personas (fictional person). Then, discuss the implications of these characteristics. How will they impact your approach to information sources and services? Using the readings as support, discuss recommendations for future researchers examining information seeking behavior in this discipline.
Step 4: Existing Guides. Compare and contrast THREE existing subject guides, pathfinders, or other professionally produced research guides related to a single sub-discipline. Provide specific examples such as particular resources that are alike and different. Which approach is most and least effective? Why? What features and resources could be added to build a more effective guide? Be specific. Use the course material guidelines for developing pathfinders for evaluation ideas.
Step 5: Professional-Quality Website. Use Weebly, Wix, Wordpress, or another website builder to share your experience. Use a different page for each of the four elements of this project. If you already have a website established for your professional porfolio, it's fine to expand it for this assignment. Think of this as a way to show potential employers that you're ready for a specialized position in librarianship.
Step 6: Posting. Go to Canvas. Post a couple sentences overview of your assignment including the discipline you investigated. Then, provide an active link to your website.
Step 7: Replying. Make at least ONE high quality reply to a peer. Your reply must include either an information source or a professional reading from the course materials.

If you're thinking about using this assignment as part of your professional portfolio, it's fine to go beyond the basic requirements. However, be sure to at least include the required items.

Checklist
Science librarianship (2 points)
The discipline and professionals (2 points)
Information seekers (3 points)
Guide analysis (2 points)
Professional quality website (2 point)
At Least ONE High Quality Replies (1 point)

Books & Ebooks

Read Books & Ebooks page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Books & Ebooks.

Post Tweet or Stump 4.
Complete Skills Log: Books & Ebooks.

Gov't Documents

Read Gov't Documents page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Gov't Documents.

Post Tweet or Stump 5.
Complete Skills Log: Gov't Documents.
Go to Canvas and take WhizQuiz 2.

Periodicals

Read Periodicals page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Periodicals.

Post Tweet or Stump 6.
Complete Skills Log: Periodicals & Databases.

Project 2: Round Up Resources - A LibGuide Pathfinder (12 Points)
Use the following guidelines to complete Project 2.

LibGuides is a subscription service used by many libraries to create pathfinders. We've been given permission to use the service free for our class.

Use the following information to access LibGuides. Contact your instructor if you have trouble signing in.
Go to https://iupui-lis.libapps.com/libapps/
Your username is your university email address as it shows in the course roster... some people have iu, iupui, or iusb email.
The username would be something like anlamb@iupui.edu
Your password is cluster1234 (or if you already have a LibGuides account from another course, use that password)

If you already work at an institution that uses LibGuides, it’s fine to use their account.

The LibApps area contains account information. You should change your password once you get into the system. You'll also want to set up your profile information.
The LibGuides area provides access to tools for creating your Guide.
Go to https://iupui-lis.libapps.com/libguides/ and choose Create Guide.

The LIBGUIDES website provides great tutorials for building your assignment.
Get Started http://support.springshare.com/libguides/training/basics
Help http://support.springshare.com/libguides

Step 1: Identify a library setting and sub-discipline for your LibGuide. Or, select a topic within a discipline as a focus. The format and presentation is up to you.
• Make use of the LibGuides tabs to separate out sections of your project.
• Complete the LibGuides profile for yourself. Please do your best professional work for this project.

Step 2: Provide an engaging introduction that includes visuals, excerpts, or other hooks to attract the interest of users. Define the focus on the LibGuide and weave in at least three professional resources (articles from the course materials).

Step 3: Incorporate at least six annotated reference sources directly related to the discipline. Discuss how the particular type of reference source might be useful. In other words, how might a dictionary be different from an encyclopedia or handbook? Be specific on how each reference source might be used to address user needs. Include at least three examples from each reference source as samples of what can be found and how it could be used.

Step 4: Incorporate at least three annotated books directly related to the discipline.
Incorporate at least one annotated e-book directly related to the discipline.
For one of the books, discuss the author's credentials, the significance of the publisher, the currency of the coverage, and the approach to the topic.

Step 5: Incorporate at least a three government sources.
For each source describe the role of the government agency in providing information.

Step 6: Incorporate materials from at least three different databases.
For each source describe how the materials are connected to the database publisher and/or larger collection.

Step 7: Incorporate at least four other information sources. They may include any type of materials you wish.

Step 8. Be sure to provide a quality annotation for each of the information sources. Each resource should contain the following information: at least one graphic (e.g. book cover, screen shot), complete citation (author, title, copyright date, publisher), summary/description, professional review excerpt, AND your own review. If they are online sources, include the URL. If they're print sources, include the call number.

Step 9. Incorporate at least three of the following pathfinder elements into your project: keywords, search strategies, step-by-step instructions for using a database, ideas for student projects, ideas for faculty, club or program ideas.

Step 10. Make at least ONE high quality reply to a peer. Your reply must include either an information source or a professional reading from the course materials.

Example
Geology and Earth Science
Zoology

Checklist
Audience, focus, and professional resources (1 point)
Reference sources (2 points)
Books and ebooks (2 points)
Government sources (2 points)
Database sources (2 points)
Pathfinder elements (1 point)
A total of 20 quality annotations (1 point)
At Least ONE High Quality Replies (1 point)

Bibliographies and Bibliometrics

Read Bibliographies and Bibliometrics page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Bibliographies.

Complete Skills Log: Bibliographies and Bibliometrics.

Grey Literature

Read Grey Literature page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Grey Literature.

Post Tweet or Stump 7.
Complete Skills Log: Grey Literature.
Go to Canvas and take WhizQuiz 3.

Project 3: Dig Deeper - Periodicals and Bibliometics (12 Points)
Use the following guidelines to complete Project 3.

For this assignment, you've got some choices based on your library setting and areas of interest.
Choose TWO of the options to complete. They should both be shared in one discussion posting.

Citation Analysis
If you're interested in academic or special library work, this option is a good choice.
Conduct a very small citation analysis to get a feel for this type of research.
1) Select a recent, well-cited research article, book, or dissertation that contains at least 12 citations in the reference list. This article, book, or dissertation should have been written by a faculty member, researcher, doctoral student, or professional associated with IUPUI or the institution of your choice. It's fine to do this at the library where you work.
2) Check to see if the materials listed in the bibliography or reference list are available in full-text through the library where this person work or is/was a student.
3) Report the results for at least 12 citations.
4) Write a report that includes the results of your story along with a discussion of the citation analysis approach. Incorporate at least five professional articles from the course readings (or others that you identify) related to citation analysis.

List Checking
If you're interested in work in a school or public library, this option is a good choice.
1) Create a list of at least a dozen "lists" or sources of lists that are connected to your discipline. It's fine to use articles that contain "best of" lists. It's fine if not all the items on the lists are related to the discipline. However, there should be a way that you can create a "sub-list" from this master list focusing on the discipline selections.
2) From this list of a dozen lists. Select three recent lists that include recommended library materials. They may be book awards lists, recommended periodicals, suggested databases, or other materials. Justify why these three lists are importance enough to examine.
3) Check these three lists against a library collection. You should be checking a total of at least 20 items. It's fine to use your own collection if you work at a library.
4) Check the same items against another library's collection using WorldCat or some other means. In other words, find another school or public library so you can do a comparison.
5) Write a report that includes a spreadsheet or table showing your results. Discuss your findings, the implications, and your conclusions. Incorporate at least three professional articles in your discussion.

Searching Forward
Scholars often wonder "does my work matter"? Does anyone read or use my work? Has my work had an impact on my field? Forward searching can address these questions as they related to a particular author and the use of his or her work.
1) Begin with a piece of grey literature such as a dissertation, conference paper, or technical report. Create a citation for this document. Use the links on the Grey Literature page to identify a starting document. Keep in mind that this work should be at least a few years old. Ten to twenty year old articles work best. Need help? Do a Google search for LANDMARK or FOUNDATIONAL works in a particular field. You'll find lots of ideas. If you can't find a piece of grey literature you love, it's okay to begin with the author of a journal article.
2) Use an Indexing and Abstracting databases, Periodical databases, and other databases to search for the author of this work and seek out journal articles and other publications written by this person on the same or a related topic. Create a bibliography listing citations for each of these works. Use the links on the Periodicals, Databases, and Indexes pages to identify documents. You might also conduct a MetaSearch for this author. Be sure that you've got the correct person.
3) Use the Citation Indexes including Web of Science Indexes and Google Scholar to determine whether any of the publications identified in steps 1 and 2 have been cited by others. Then, create a bibliography containing a dozen notable works along with the total number found. Find full-text articles on at least a few of these works. How did the original work contribute to the new work?
4) What's your conclusion? Do you think that the author's work has made an impact? If so, how?
5) Share your results as a professional, quality paper.

Searching Backward
Backward searching will allow scholars to trace back to see what articles had an impact on a given work. It's also an interesting way to gain insights into an author and their work.
1) Identify a scholar that is well-published in a specific discipline. This person should appear in an journal article devoted to this person, a subject specific biography reference, or Wikipedia. Create a short biographical sketch and list of their works creating formal citations for each item.
2) Do an author search in Indexing and Abstracting databases and Periodical databases to locate full-text articles, papers, and books by this person. You may also want to do a Google and Google Scholar search. Select ten works by this author. Analyze the articles. What's the the relationships among these publications? Do they represent different phases of a particular project or different pieces of research? Do the articles follow a particular organizational scheme?
3) Analyze and compare the bibliographies or reference lists found at the end of the articles looking for patterns. Are the publications listed through self-citations (i.e., the author citing him/herself)? Does this person cite the same people? Are the people cited connected to the author in some way (e.g., same university, same publication, same co-author)?
4) What's your conclusion? Looking back over this author's body of work, can you find patterns? Can you identify particular people or lines of thought that influenced this person's work?
5) Share your results as a professional, quality paper.

Citation Chasing: Reaching Way, Way Back
Backward searching is a great way to understand how a discipline has evolved over time. It's also an interesting way to track the roots of a new interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, or cross-disciplinary field.
1) Identify a hot new article in a popular new interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, or cross-disciplinary field. It's okay if the topic is within a single discipline as long as it represents a revolutionary or unique way of thinking.
2) Locate the items (e..g, books, articles, papers, websites) referenced in the article's bibliography or reference list. Pick a few you think are the most important and find those articles. Then, pick of a few of the coolest or most influential articles and work backwards again. Do a Google Scholar Search on your picks to see if others have cited these articles. Go back at least four layers until you end up with what you think are some of the foundational articles or sources.
3) Share your results in a visual form on an INFOGRAPHIC (e.g., Piktochart, Infogram, Easely, Venngage) showing the relationships among the articles. It should include at least a dozen articles. Include a brief paragraph on your infographic that shares your overall conclusions. Check out an example.

Replies.
Make at least TWO high quality reply to a peer. Your replies must include either an information source or a professional reading from the course materials.

Checklist
Option 1 (5 points)
Option 2 (5 points)
At Least TWO High Quality Replies (2 points)

Archives, Libraries, and Museums

Read Archives, Libraries, and Museums page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Archives, Libraries, and Museums.

Post Tweet or Stump 8.
Complete Skills Log: Archives, Libraries, and Museums.

Technology Resources

Read Technology Resources page and watch video.
Read Science and Technology: Tech Resources.

Complete Skills Log: Technology Resources. Submit your Skills Log to the Assignments area of Canvas.
Go to Canvas and take WhizQuiz 4.

Project 4: Share the Fun (12 Points)
Use the following guidelines to complete Project 4.

Step 1: Identify an audience for your project such as students in a theatre course, participants in a library art club, members of a Shakespeare lover's group, or members of a church congregation.

Step 2: Choose one social media tool (e.g., Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, Tumblr, Wordpress blog, YouTube channel, another one of your choice) that you think would be effective for communicating advanced information sources to your patrons. Don’t use your personal account. Instead, make a professional page or account you can use for professional work.
If you're taking 2 classes, choose a different social media tool for each course for a different experience.

Step 3: Identify a theme such as common problems, questions, or barriers to information use. It could be a seasonal topic such as Christmas music, a special promotion such as art appreciation month, a problem such as conflict in religion, or some other thematic connection to your audience.

Step 4: Create a series of at least 15 postings (in real-life you might make these over a series of days, weeks, or months). Each posting should contain a description of an information source, a way it might be used or a question it might address, and at least one image related to the item.
If you choose Twitter or Pinterest, you need 25 postings. Example 1
If you choose to build a YouTube channel, you need 10 very short video postings.

Step 5: Your postings should focus on sharing pieces of grey literature; materials from archives, libraries, and/or museums; and technology resources. You need to include at least the following basic items:
1) four pieces of grey literature
3) an archive
4) a library
5) a museum
6) a mobile app
7) an online tool or social media website
8) an image collection
9) an audio, video and/or animation
10) a website

Step 6: Somewhere in your postings you need to reference at least four of the professional articles you read in this section of the course. These can be woven into the social media or in a separate paper.

Step 7: Provide a high quality reply that includes a reference to an information source WITHIN the discipline. Also, explore the course pages from the other disciplines. Make a second reply that incorporates an information source from ANOTHER discipline that relates to the peer posting.

Checklist
Audience and theme (1 point)
Social media setup (1 point)
Required postings (3 points)
Information sources (3 points)
Professional articles (2 points)
At Least One Within Discipline Reply (1 point)
At Least One Cross-Disciplinary Reply (1 point)

 


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