Electronic Materials Logo

Information Architecture for Digital Libraries


To read the transcript of this video, go to Transcripts.

Objectives
Evaluate, select, and apply digital library technologies including open source and proprietary software for digital library development.
Discuss concepts in data and digital object interoperability, use, and reuse.
Develop a prototype digital library collection.

While some students in this course have taken the advanced technology courses including S532 Information Architecture for the Web, others haven't. If you don't have a background in technology, be sure to read all of the suggested readings.

readRead!
If you don't have an extensive background in technology,
Read Zimmerman, Matt (2013). Understanding Key Technology Concepts. In, J. Monson, LITA Guide: Jump-Start Your Career as a Digital Librarian, 91-105. American Library Association. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

The page will focus on software for digital libraries. While some projects may require technical skills in setting up servers, installing software, and writing code, most digital projects are likely to use "turnkey applications" that are "ready to go".

Digital Library Websites

pinch“Many libraries have implemented discovery layer services designed to deliver unified results across resource and collection types. The configuration and local enhancement/customization of a discovery service enhances the user experience and encompasses the library’s print, media, electronic resource, library services, library staff and expertise, and resource guides. Enhanced discovery requires library staff with systems thinking and web development skill sets“ (ACRL, 2015, 14).

Most digital libraries maintain a user-friendly website along with a discovery interface. Sometimes these are both supplied by the same vendor. In other cases, they're two separate systems. In addition, they may maintain many digital collections. Sometimes these digital collections are interconnected.

Fox and others (2011) define a digital library system as

"a software system that is based on a defined (possibly distributed) architecture and provides all functionality required by a particular Digital Library. Users interact with a Digital Library through the corresponding Digital Library System."

Fox and others (2011) define a digital library management system (DLMS) as

"a generic software system that provides the appropriate software infrastructure both (i) to produce and administer a Digital Library System incorporating the suite of functionality considered fundamental for Digital Libraries and (ii) to integrate additional software offering more refined, specialized or advanced functionality."

sfpl

Let's explore digital library websites, discovery services, and digital collection software platforms.

Digital Library Websites

fingersWhen digital library users want to "go to the library", they need a user-friendly entry point to the Web. They want an attractive library website that will address their wide range of information needs. Users expect to be able to find what they need in three clicks or less.

In many cases, the digital library website is also used as the general library website. In other words, the "digital resources" aspect may be limited to a particular area of the website. However in other cases, the entire website may be dedicated to digital objects.

Users should be able to easily determine how to access electronic databases, download ebooks and audiobooks, stream music and videos, or search digital collections. They should also be able to ask a librarian for help, receive reference assistance, or find answers to library program questions.

The Challenge of Digital Services

One of the primary challenges of building digital library websites relates to digital services. If it's difficult to use the website to download e-books or use electronic databases, they're not likely to be used. NYPL and partner libraries across the country are testing innovative library policies and practices with funding from IMLS while adopting new technologies in order to create improved user experiences borrowing eBooks from libraries.

videoWatch!
Watch English, James (Winter 2015). Library simplified. The Journal of Electronic Publishing, 18(1). Available online.

try itTry It!
Go to the Digital Libraries: By Library Type page of our course. Explore library websites. Is the website easy to use? Can information be accessed in three clicks or less? Is this a general library website or one specifically designed for digital users? Think about ways to make the website more usable to those seeking digital objects.

Then, seek out their discovery interface. How are information sources accessed? Are two different systems used? If so, are they seamlessly connected?

library

Web-Scale Discovery Services

How will users search, browse, select, and access the digital content they seek? Whether a user is seeking an ebook, a journal article, or an historical image, digital library users expect an intuitive and easy-to-use interface to assist them in locating information. The ability to easily access content is essential to the success of a digital library.

Web-scale Discovery Services are tools that seamlessly search across local and remote content for useful results. Although this sounds great, there are challenges to implementation. For instance, proprietary-content providers would prefer that their customers use their discovery services. In other words, OCLC, EBSCO, ProQuest, Ex Libris, and other don't always play well together.

According to Reitz (2014), a discovery service is

"a single interface, providing integrated access to the multiple information resources (catalogs, publishers' e-book and e-journal collections, subscription databases, archival collections) to which a library has rights. Discovery systems use consolidated subject indexing and metadata. Search results are generally deduped and relevance ranked."

Both open source and commercial options are available for discovery interfaces. Commercial examples include:

Commercial resource management systems with discovery services include:

Open source options include:

try itTry It!
Explore discovery interfaces. Create a list of features you think are important based on your library type of interest.

Digital Library Spotlight
VuFind is an open source library resource portal that enables users to search and browse through all of the library’s resources. The software is modular, so developers can use the pieces that best match their needs. Replacing the traditional OPAC, the system includes
Catalog Records
Locally Cached Journals
Digital Library Items
Institutional Repository
Institutional Bibliography
Other Library Collections and Resources

Sowiport is an example of an information portal that uses the discovery power of Vufind. This social sciences library contains over 8 million literature references, research projects, and full text from 18 databases. Heinert, Sawitzki, and Mayr (2015) have found that Sowiport is able to support the needs of users at different points in the information seeking process.

readRead!
Read at least TWO of the following articles focusing on library resource discovery.

Breeding, Marshall (February 2015). The Future of Library Resource Discovery. A white paper commissioned by the NISO Discovery to Delivery (D2D) Topic Committee. Available online.

Breeding, Marshall (January 2015). Selection strategies for strategic library technologies. Computers in Libraries, 35(1), 23-27.

Hienert, Daniel, Sawitzki, Frank, & Mayr, Philipp (March/April 2015). Digital library research in action: supporting information retrieval in Sowiport. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Yang, Sharon Q. (October 1, 2014). Charting discovery system improvements (2010-2013). Computers in Libraries, 34(8), 10-14.

Software Platforms for Digital Collections

Many different software tools are available for creating digital collections. It's unlikely that you're going to build your own software platform. Instead, you'll probably choose a turnkey, content management system that's ready to go.

Keep in mind that many large institutions may use many of these software tools for different purposes. For instance, The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries uses CONTENTdm for their Image & Multimedia Collections, but they use DigitalCommons by bepress for their Digital Repository needs.

Choosing a Platform

Librarians are faced with a wide range of software options that often have overlapping purposes.

According to Joan Reitz (2014), digital asset management (DAM) are

"systems designed to organize and display digital content produced in a variety of media types. The content is usually locally owned and controlled, rather than licensed from a third party. Most of the DAM systems offered by the leading library automation vendors use standards other than the MARC record, such as XML, the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH), Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standards (METS), and JPEG2000. The rapid pace of archival and special collections digitization projects has created the need for DAM systems. Synonymous with digital object management."

readRead!
Read at least TWO of the following articles. Notice the software platform that was chosen for each project.

Grunberg, Eve, Francis, Francesca, & Basely, Jennifer (2014). Sailing the Digital Seas: Charting a New Course with CONTENTdm. The Serials Librarian, 66(1-4), 204-211.

Lazarinis, Georgios Gkoumas Fotis (2015). Evaluation and usage scenarios of open source digital library and collection management tools. Program: electronic library and information systems, 49(3), 226-241.

Rehberger, Dean (Winter/Spring 2013). Getting oral history online: collections management applications. Oral History Review, 40(1), 83-94.

Urgola, Stephen (March 2014). Archiving Egypt’s revolution: the ‘University on the Square Project’, documenting January 25, 2011 and beyond. International Federation of Library Associations Journal, 40(1), 12-16.

Let's explore the options in alphabetical order. Be sure to note "the bottom line" in each section.

BePress and Digital Commons

digitalcommonsDigitalCommons is a hosted, cloud-based, open access repository solution that uses bepress (Berkeley Electronic Press) software. This is a commercial rather than an open source solution. Users pay an annual license fee. According to their website, it includes "a suite of tools and services that enables institutions to manage, display, and publish scholarship to the web in a beautiful, highly visible showcase." Both traditional and "professional grade" options are available. SelectedWorks is a less expensive option.

The Bottom Line... Rolling the software and hosting into one package makes it much easier for libraries with limited on-site support. The relatively low price makes it accessible to many mid-sized institutions, however it may still be too expensive for smaller libraries.

readRead!
Read the FAQs from DigitalCommons.
Explore some of their model projects.

Examples of BePress/Digital Commons Projects

ContentDM

contendmContentDM is the most popular commercial, digital collection management software solution. It provides tools for organizing, managing, and searching digital collections online. A number of licensing levels are available based on current collection size and future plans. A hosting service is also available. Because of the connection with OCLC, it's the choice of many public and academic libraries.

A free, 60-day evaluation is available to try the system. The fully featured, hosted evaluation allows users to try it out without obligation.

The Bottom Line... those libraries that already have a relationship with OCLC will find this to be a seamless solution for digital collection needs. However, smaller libraries may find it expensive. Because of its popularity, many online resources are available to learn how to use this software.

We'll be using this package for creating our prototype digital collection.

readRead!
Explore the CONTENTdm resources from OCLC for an overview of the software and services available.

Examples of CONTENTdm Projects

The Digital Collections of the Indianapolis Public Library use CONTENTdm. This library is working with many local organizations on a community digitization project.

The Center for Digital Scholarship at IUPUI is using CONTENTdm for it's Cultural Heritage Digital Collections.

The Indiana Historical Society uses CONTENTdm for their Digital Image Collections.

The Digital Collections of the Wisconsin Historical Society are well established and are powered by CONTENTdm.

Other examples include

To find libraries that use CONTENTdm, go to their Browse Collections page. Unfortunately, these links just provide examples. To find the complete digital collections, search for the library and the word CONTENTdm to find their digital collection.

Resources

If you're interested in using the CONTENTdm software, spend some time with the following online learning materials.

Other Resources

DSpace

dspaceDSpace software is a turnkey institutional repository application. It's used by academic and research libraries as an open access repository for managing their faculty and student output. 

Many organizations use the software to host and manage their repositories. Used by over 1000 organizations worldwide, it's a popular open that's easy to use. According to their website, "it is free and easy to install "out of the box" and completely customizable to fit the needs of any organization."

Keep in mind that one of the key features of DSpace is the ability to have submitters deposit their own files into the system. When selecting software for a digital library, think about whether this is a service that should be available to users.

videoWatch!
Watch a DSpace Introductory Video that walks you through how DSpace works. If you want to learn more, consider browsing some of the recorded webinars available.

 

The Bottom Line... Although it's most commonly used as a tool for building and managing institutional repositories, it's also used for other purposes. For instance, it can be used to develop image, audio, and video repositories. It can also be used for museum materials, government records and reports, subject-area content, and learning resources. Multi-organizational consortium are also using it for federated repositories. The key is whether you want users to be able to add to the collection.

readRead!
Read the DSpace Diagram. This infographic explains how the software works.

readRead!
Read the User FAQs at the DSpace wiki.

Examples of DSpace Projects

readRead!
Go to DSpace and skim their featured cases for examples of organizations that use DSpace and ways that it's used.

try itTry It!
Go to the DSpace Demo and do some exploring. You don't need to build anything. However, get a sense for the software and it's options. Keep in mind that the demonstration site resets itself every Saturday. It's designed as a sandbox to explore, not to house a collection.

Resources

If you're interested in using the DSpace software, spend some time with the following online learning materials.

Fedora

fedoraFEDORA (Flexible Extensible Digital Object Repository Architecture) is a framework for building digital repositories. As an architecture for storing and accessing digital objects stored in METS-encoded XML, it includes a set of APIs for access to the repository. Funded by Mellon and developed at UVA/Cornell, it's free, and open-source. According to the DuraSpace website,

"Fedora (fedorarepository.org) is an open source project that provides flexible, extensible and durable digital object management software. First released in 2004, it has hundreds of adopters worldwide, with deep roots in the research, scientific, intellectual and cultural heritage communities. It is supported by its community of users, and stewarded by DuraSpace."

Fedora is NOT a complete management, indexing, discovery, and delivery application. Instead, it's intended provides the management layer for digital objects. It's intended to be used in connection with other applications for digital preservation and archiving.

In choosing Fedora Repository Software, Goddard Library Repository website states "the basic requirements established for the repository included the ability to:

The Bottom Line... Practically, this software is best used by someone with technology support who can match it with the other elements needed to create the type of digital collection necessary to meet library needs.

Examples of Fedora Projects

To explore repositories that use Fedora, go to the Fedora User Registry page.

Omeka

omekaOmeka is an open source software platform for publishing digital collections online. It's a project of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. According to the website,

"Omeka is a next-generation web publishing platform for museums, historical societies, scholars, enthusiasts, and educators. Omeka provides cultural institutions and individuals with easy-to-use software for publishing collections and creating attractive, standards-based, interoperable online exhibits. Free and open-source, Omeka is designed to satisfy the needs of institutions that lack technical staffs and large budgets. Bringing Web 2.0 technologies and approaches to historical and cultural websites, Omeka fosters the kind of user interaction and participation that is central to the mission of public scholarship and education."

Omeka.net allows uses to host their collections, research, exhibits, and digital projects. According to the website,

"Omeka.net is web-publishing platform that allows anyone with an account to create or collaborate on a website to display collections and build digital exhibitions. No technical skills or special server requirements are necessary. Sign up, and start sharing."

The Bottom Line... This is a great choice for small libraries with limited funds. You can get started with the software using their free hosting service with no financial investment other than your own time. On the other hand, it's not as sophisticated as some of the other options.

We'll be using this tool for sharing our digital objects.

readRead!
Read Omeka: Serious Web Publishing.
Browse the Documentation.
Visit Omeka.net and explore hosting options.

Examples of Omeka Projects

Spend some time examining individual items as well as collections. While some digital collections simply contain a database of digital objects along with a search tool, others make interesting use of the objects. Don't get bogged down with words like database, archive, and collection. Instead, think about the individual digital objects and how they are accessed and used.

In Martha Washington: A Life, notice how the website revolves around Martha's Biography. However, when digital objects in the biography such as photographs are clicked, the digital object archival information is displayed.

Compare the contents of the various collections and the information recorded for each item.

For instance, The September 11 Digital Archive focuses on items and collections, while Gulag: Many Days, Many Lives organizes their project into archive (items) and exhibits. The exhibits provide context for the items in the archive.

Examples of Omeka User Guides

readRead!
Read Oh, S., Choi, W. and Valisa, S. (2013). The sonzogno digital library project. Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 50: 1–4. This article provides an overview of a project that uses Omeka. Note the role that Omeka played in the process of developing the digital library.

Others

Many other open-source and commercial solutions exist.

Keep in mind that there are many other choices. Spend some time visiting digital collections. In many cases, the FAQ page or ABOUT page provide information about the technical side of the collection.

Digital Library Spotlight
According to their user guide, the Darwin Online search facilities "are built on the popular and stable open-source Lucene search engine which is used by numerous institutions and businesses around the world, including JSTOR - The Scholarly Journal Archive and NSDL – The National Science Digital Library. This use of Lucene 'fuses together' the free text indexes acquired from the electronic documents themselves, together with the traditional bibliographic and manuscript records to present a unified view of the data- integrating date and metadata." 

readRead!
Read about at least ONE of the following platforms:

Abbott, Jennifer & Sandberg, Tami (June 1, 2014). Going WILD for Drupal. Computers in Libraries, 34(4), 13-16.

Kent, Alex (December 1, 2014). Islandora. Computers in Libraries, 34(9), 13-15, 31-32.

DuraSpace Support

DuraSpace is a non-profit organization that are involved with projects such as DSpace, Fedora, and VIVO. According to their website, they are

"providing leadership and innovation for open technologies that promote durable, persistent access to digital data. We collaborate with academic, scientific, cultural, and technology communities by supporting projects and creating services to help ensure that current and future generations have access to our collective digital heritage."

In addition to their non-profit wing, they also provide connections to subscription-based services. While some institutions maintain their own services, many use hosting services.

DuraSpace collaborated with the Bishoff Group to conduct a survey of non-ARL academic libraries to determine the status of digital content creation, management, and preservation activities. They found that many libraries see hosted services as a good choice because they offer services not always available locally (Bishoff & Carissa, 2015).

readRead!
Read Bishoff, Liz & Smith, Carissa (March/April 2015). Managing digital collections survey results. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Related Tools

In some cases, digital libraries involve the public in assisting with projects. They may also provide tools for notetaking and other research functions. There are many software tools that can be used to extend the digital library experience.

Open Source Tools

Anthologize is open-source software that uses the power of WordPress to transform online content into an electronic book. It can't be used at WordPress.com, but it can be installed on individual servers.

"Anthologize is a free, open-source, plugin that transforms WordPress into a platform for publishing electronic texts. Grab posts from your WordPress blog, import feeds from external sites, or create new content directly within Anthologize. Then outline, order, and edit your work, crafting it into a single volume for export in several formats, including—in this release—PDF, ePUB, TEI."

PressForward is free and open-source software for curating and sharing content from the web. According to the project website,

"PressForward enables teams of researchers to aggregate, filter, and disseminate relevant scholarship using the popular WordPress web publishing platform. Just about anything available on the open web is fair game: traditional journal articles, conference papers, white papers, reports, scholarly blogs, and digital projects."

Scripto is a free, open source tool that enables community transcriptions of document and multimedia files. According to the website,

Scripto brings the power of MediaWiki to your collections. Designed to allow members of the public to transcribe a range of different kinds of files, Scripto will increase your content’s findability while building your user community through active engagement. There are plugins or extensions for Drupal, Omeka, and WordPress.

Serendip-o-matic is an open-source tool for use with digital collections. According to the project website,

"Serendip-o-matic connects your sources to digital materials located in libraries, museums, and archives around the world. By first examining your research interests, and then identifying related content in locations such as the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), Europeana, and Flickr Commons, our serendipity engine helps you discover photographs, documents, maps and other primary sources.

Whether you begin with text from an article, a Wikipedia page, or a full Zotero collection, Serendip-o-matic's special algorithm extracts key terms and returns a surprising reflection of your interests. Because the tool is designed mostly for inspiration, search results aren't meant to be exhaustive, but rather suggestive, pointing you to materials you might not have discovered. At the very least, the magical input-output process helps you step back and look at your work from a new perspective. Give it a whirl. Your sources may surprise you."

For other ideas, go to the CHNM Tool Center.

Google's collaborative, cloud-based software is an example of the way productivity tools can be used by digital library uses. Librarians may suggest that they keep track of objects in a spreadsheet or take notes in a word processor.

Other sources of software ideas:

try itTry It!
Describe a tool that could be built into your digital library or used in connection with your digital library. For instance, could you use Scripto to help transcribe local diaries you scans. Or, Google Docs for note taking.

Beyond the Basics

Beyond the basics, many digital library developers are creating systems that address important issues related to digital objects and collections. Although the specifics of these tools and approaches are beyond the scope of this course, they help digital librarians see the potential for building smarter digital libraries.

Complex Objects

Complex objects is an example. According to Kozievitch and Torres (2014), "complex objects consist of multiple digital objects... In other words, a complex object is an aggregation of objects that can be grouped together and manipulated as a single object."

readSkim!
Skim Kozievitch, Nadia P. & Torres, Richardo da Silva (2014). Complex Objects. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, 1-28. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

A number of technologies are used to handle complex objects. In 2006, Digital Content Component (DCC) was introduced as a generalization format for representing complex objects. A DDC contains four distinct subdivisions:

According to Kozievitch and Torres (2014), buckets provide an "archive-independent container construct" that allows data types and objects to be grouped together into a single object.

Kozievitch and Torres (2014, 7), note that "OAI-ORE aims to develop, identify, and profile extensible standards and protocols to allow repositories, agents, and services to interoperate in the context of use and reuse of COs."

readSkim!
Skim Witt, Michael (2010). Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE): A Library Technology Report. ALA Editions. Available as an ebook through IUPUI. This book provides outstanding information about how objects can be reused and exchanged in an open environment.

Content-Based Image Retrieval

Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) systems perform queries on visual properties such as colors, shapes, and patterns to help create useful descriptors for images.

readSkim!
Skim Torres, Richardo da Silva, Kozievitch, Nadia P., Murthy, Uma & Falcao, Alexandre X. (2014). Content-Based Image Retrieval. In, E. Fox & J. Leidig, Digital Libraries Applications: CBIR, Education, Social Networks, eScience/Simulation, and GIS. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Annotation

Annotation is another example of developers and researching thinking beyond the basic uses of digital objects. This involves working with subdocuments within original digital objects. For instance, users might wish to take notes, label, or combine snippets of objects to develop new understandings.

readSkim!
Skim Murthy, Uma, Delcambre, Lois M., Torres, Richardo da Silva and Kozievitch, Nadia P (2014). Annotation. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, 29-61. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Geospatial Information

In many cases, there's a need to connect digital objects to geospatial information. In particular, videos and images are often connected to specific locations.

readSkim!
Skim Li, Lin Tzy & Torres, Richardo da Silva (2014). Geospatial Information. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, 85-120. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

readRead!
Read Sorensen, Justin B. (March/April 2015). Reconstructing the past through Utah Sanborn fire insurance maps: A geospatial approach to library resources. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Design for End-Users

Beyond developing a high-quality database of digital objects, it's important to think about how end-users will explore your digital collection.

try itTry It!
Explore Visualizing NYC.
Notice how a visual interface is used to explore digital objects.
Think about the librarian's role in designing interfaces that facilitate the use of digital objects.

Education

Many disciplines are looking for effective ways to make use of digital objects, collections, and libraries. In the area of education, easy access reusable learning objects is particularly important.

readSkim!
Skim Fouh, Eric & Chen, YinLin (2014). Education. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, 27-43. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

In the Real World

So, what tools do people use in the "real world"? In most cases, libraries end up using a combination of software.

Existing Tools

From Internet Archive to Flickr, there are many excellent digital projects underway. Why reinvent the wheel? Depending on the mission of the digitization project, it might make sense to build an ebook collection in Internet Archive or create a photo collection in Flickr. Particularly for school and small public libraries, joining an existing project makes sense. Keep in mind that even very large organizations use these existing tools. Check out The Commons for many institutions working with Flickr.

Digital Library Spotlight
The British Library has released millions of photos on Flickr. Check out the British Library Flickr collection to see the wide range of images available.

Even small libraries can participate in Internet Archive's program.

try itTry It
Read Internet Archive Tutorial. Think about what type of library or project would work well using Internet Archive.

In-house vs Cloud-based Approaches

In the past, many institutions maintained their own servers and software. However increasingly, libraries are looking outside their institution for hardware, software, and storage support. Gullian Oliver and Steve Knight (2015) note that “worldwide, many governments are mandating a 'cloud first' policy for information technology infrastructures.” However, they found that this approach presents challenges.

readRead!
Read Oliver, Gillian & Knight, Steve (March/April 2015). Storage is a strategic issue: digital preservation in the cloud. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

 

CONTENTdm Directions

Below are directions for using CONTENTdm.

Entering Items and Metadata into a Collection

  1. Go to the class website and login using the username/password provided in class.
  2. Click the COLLECTIONS tab. Choose the name of YOUR collection.
  3. Click the ITEMS tab. Choose ADD.
  4. Choose Add an item. Click CHOOSE FILE. Upload your file.
  5. Add metadata for the item.
  6. At the bottom of the template, click ADD. You should see the following statement: The item has been added to the pending queue. An empty template will appear.
  7. Click the ITEMS tab. Choose APPROVE.
  8. Choose APPROVE & INDEX ALL.
  9. Choose VIEW COLLECTION from the navigation bar. It may take a minute, but your digital object should be available.

Establish Collection Field Properties

You'll need to configure properties for your metadata schema or application profile. The default format is simple Dublin Core.

  1. Click the COLLECTIONS tab. Choose FIELD PROPERTIES. Notice the list of metadata fields.
  2. To edit a field, find the field you wish to edit. Click EDIT from the right side of the field. Make changes. Or, if you want to remove it, choose DELETE.
  3. To add a field, click ADD FIELD in the upper-right corner of the field properties table.
  4. Enter the name of the field and select the relevant information. Keep in mind that you can use a hierarchical structure such as "element.subelement". For instance, enter the element name "measurement.size" or "measurement.shape".
  5. Use the directions above to input data using the template you've established.

Resources

Abbott, Jennifer & Sandberg, Tami (June 1, 2014). Going WILD for Drupal. Computers in Libraries, 34(4), 13-16.

ACRL (March 2015). Environmental Scan 2015. Available online.

Bishoff, Liz & Smith, Carissa (March/April 2015). Managing digital collections survey results. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Breeding, Marshall (February 2015). The Future of Library Resource Discovery. A white paper commissioned by the NISO Discovery to Delivery (D2D) Topic Committee. Available online.

Breeding, Marshall (January 2015). Selection strategies for strategic library technologies. Computers in Libraries, 35(1), 23-27.

Breeding, Marshall (November 2013). Technology alternatives for special collections. Computers in Libraries, 33(9), 19-22.

Fouh, Eric & Chen, Yin Lin (2014). Education. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, 27-43. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Fox, Edward A., Yang, Seungwon, Ewers, John, Wildemuth, Barbara, Pomerantz, Jeffrey P., Oh, Sanghee (2011). 1-a (10-c): Digital Library Curriculum Development Module. Collaborative Research: Curriculum Development: Digital Libraries. Available: http://curric.dlib.vt.edu/modDev/modules/DL_1-a_2011-05-11.pdf

Hastings, Robin (November 2013). How we chose a platform to bring Kansas History Alive. Computers in Libraries, 33(9), 10-15.

Hienert, Daniel, Sawitzki, Frank, & Mayr, Philipp (March/April 2015). Digital library research in action: supporting information retrieval in Sowiport. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Kent, Alex (December 1, 2014). Islandora. Computers in Libraries, 34(9), 13-15, 31-32.

Lazarinis, Georgios Gkoumas Fotis (2015). Evaluation and usage scenarios of open source digital library and collection management tools. Program: electronic library and information systems, 49(3), 226-241.

Li, Lin Tzy & Torres, Richardo da Silva (2014). Geospatial Information. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, 85-120. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Kozievitch, Nadia P. & Torres, Richardo da Silva (2014). Compex Objects. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Murthy, Uma, Delcambre, Lois M., Torres, Richardo da Silva and Kozievitch, Nadia P (2014). Annotation. In E. Fox, R. Torres, Digital Library Technologies: Complex Objects, Annotation, Ontologies, Classification, Extraction, and Security. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services, 29-61. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Oliver, Gillian & Knight, Steve (March/April 2015). Storage is a strategic issue: digital preservation in the cloud. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Richey, Nancy (July 1, 2014). WKU libraries: Using PastPerfect to open hidden collections. Computers in Libraries, 34(5), 12-14, 31-32.

Sorensen, Justin B. (March//April 2015). Reconstructing the past through Utah Sanborn fire insurance maps: A geospatial approach to library resources. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Torres, Richardo da Silva, Kozievitch, Nadia P., Murthy, Uma & Falcao, Alexandre X. (2014). Content-Based Image Retrieval. In, E. Fox & J. Leidig, Digital Libraries Applications: CBIR, Education, Social Networks, eScience/Simulation, and GIS. Synthesis Lectures on Information Concepts, Retrieval, and Services. Morgan & Claypool Publishers. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Witt, Michael (2010). Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE): A Library Technology Report. ALA Editions. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Zimmerman, Matt (2013). Understanding Key Technology Concepts. In, J. Monson, LITA Guide: Jump-Start Your Career as a Digital Librarian, 91-105. American Library Association. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.


| eduscapes | IUPUI Online Courses | About Us | Contact Us | © 2015-2016 Annette Lamb

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.