Electronic Materials Logo

Digital Library Management & Evaluation


To read the transcript of this video, go to Transcripts.

Objectives
Discuss the major issues in the development and management of digital libraries.
Demonstrate practical skills and theoretical concepts related to digital library planning, development, organization, management, use, and preservation.

Whether in charge of a medical library or a school library, digital librarians need to have a tough job. Not only do they need to manage the day-to-day operation of the digital library, but they also must supervise an array of digital projects.

planning

Digital Library Management

Managing a digital library involves much more than purchasing subscriptions and building digital collections.

readRead!
Read at least TWO of the following articles.

Hansen, Jens Hofman (2012). How to Make Digital Objects Available to Library Users in a Sustainable Way. Microform & Digitization Review, 41(3/4), 180-185.

King, David Lee (2012). Running the Digital Branch : Guidelines for Operating the Library Website. Chicago, IL, USA: American Library Association. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Webb, Heidi J. (October 1, 2014). Managing e-resources: did you choose your stuff or did it choose you? Computers in Libraries, 34(8), 16-20.

try itTry It!
Skim Baker, David P., and Evans, Wendy (2013). Chandos Information Professional Series : Handbook of Digital Library Economics : Operations, Collections and Services. Jordon Hill, GBR: Chandos Publishing. Available as an ebook through IUPUI. Think about what it takes to run a library create a list of activities.

Digital Project Management

According to Edward Corrado and Heather Moulaison (2014, 6),

“digital preservation is not merely a technical problem that can be solved via backups or through the acquisition of a turnkey repository. Certainly there are many aspects of digital preservation that require a complex technical infrastructure and the skilled people necessary to operate it; but above and beyond all of that, ensuring ongoing access to digital content over time requires careful reflection and planning."

Edward Corrado and Heather Moulaison (2014, 21), describe a digital preservation triad: management, technology, and content. The note that each element is essential. In other sections of the course, we've discussed technology and content. In this section, we'll focus on the management aspects of digitization projects.

Planning for Digitization

Lots of work goes into planning and managing a digital library.

Digital Library Spotlight
Go to the Albert Einstein Online. Explore the ABOUT section and background information about the planning of the project. Also, explore the digital collection itself.

readRead!
Read Menelsson, Dalia, Falk, Edith, & Oliver, Amalya L. (2014). The Albert Einstein digitization project: hidden treasures. In J. Chang, W. Zhang and I. Alon (eds.), Library Hi Tech, Volume 32 : Structuring the digital domain. Bradford, GBR: Emerald Insight, 318-335. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

videoWatch!
Watch The Anatomy of a Digital Project Webinar Series (University of Illinois, CARLI). This series discusses the process of managing a digital collection from selection to digital preservation. Each video is an hour long, so you wish to scan those of interest.

Budgeting for Digitization

The cost of a digitization project can be enormous. A number of new tools can help with planning. The Library Digitization Cost Calculator aggregates available data on the cost and time to perform tasks related to digitization.

calculator

Collaboration for Digitization

You can't do everything yourself. In some cases, you'll use staff to assist in digitization projects. In other projects, you'll collaborate with other departments or even other libraries.

readRead!
Read Atkins, Winston, Goethals, Andrea, Kussmann, Carol, Phillips, Meg, Vardigan, Mary (December 2013). Staffing for Effective Digital Preservation. An NDSA Report. Available online.

readRead!
Read Weiss, Andrew (2013). Collaborating on Digital Projects. In, J. Monson, LITA Guide: Jump-Start Your Career as a Digital Librarian, 127-144. American Library Association. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

try itTry It!
Go to Explore Chicago Collections. Dozens of institutions and agencies have collaborated on the creation of this amazing interface to provide access to multiple digital collections all related to Chicago.
Think about the value of this type of cooperation in collection development and dissemination.

readingDigital Collection Spotlight

READING: HARVARD VIEWS OF READERS, READERSHIP, and READING HISTORY
is an online source for exploring the intellectual, cultural, and political history of reading.

Contents: Sharing historical holdings of the Harvard Libraries, this unique collection includes annotated books by authors like John Keats and Herman Melville. Library records show what people like Emerson, Longfellow, and Thoreau were reading. Sections include learning to read, reading collectively, reading on one’s own, and collection highlights.

Connections: Librarians will find this collection of professional interest. However, it would also be useful to teens and teachers in the area of history and English.

To visit the collection, go to http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/reading/.

 

Digital Library Assessment

planning

Assessment is the "quantitative and qualitative measurement of the degree to which a library's collections, services, and programs meet the needs of its users, usually undertaken with the aim of improving performance. Assessment is accomplished by various methods, including direct observation, analysis of feedback obtained through interviews, user surveys, testing, etc." (Reitz, 2014).

The Purpose of Assessment

As an emerging and constantly changing area of librarianship, digital library assessment is essential to create and maintain a high level of quality.

According to Jody DeRidder and Joyce Chapman (2015),

“research and cultural heritage institutions are increasingly focused on providing online access to digital special collections and archives. Assessment is a necessity: in the face of limited resources and tremendous demand for online access to digital library materials, we need to strategically focus our efforts and better understand and measure the value, impact, and associated costs of digital library materials. However, methods for assessment of digital libraries are not yet standardized. As a result, many librarians and archivists are at a loss as to how to begin to assess costs, benefits, and usability.”

DeRidder and Chapman (2015) point out that the Digital Library Federation (DLF) is developing best practices and guidelines for assessment. An assessment wiki has been developed to share guidelines as they become available at http://wiki.diglib.org/Assessment. The wikis the following concentrations:

more statsData Collection

Daniel Teruggi (2010, 36-37) describes different approaches to getting user feedback to help with library improvement.

When users access the library’s resources, a wide range of data can be collected. This data can be useful in examining who uses the collection and how it is used. For instance, Ronald Snijder (2015) conducted a study of an open access repository e-book library in Austrian to measure the “scholarly impact and societal relevance in the humanities and social sciences.” He analyzed usage data and information about the service providers. He analysis concluded that researchers around the world were accessing the ebooks.

readRead!
Read West, Jessmyn (May/June 2015). Counting the Right Thing. Computers in Libraries, 35(5), 27-31.

"At a time when Internet search engines have become the default discovery layer for most users, libraries need to report that their websites and digital repositories are discoverable through those search engines as well" (O'Brien & Arlitsch, 2015).

The Getting Found (GF) Cookbook provides a step-by-step video guide to help libraries measure and monitor the search engine optimization (SEO) performance of their digital repositories.

stats

Web-Based Tools

You don't need to do all the data collection by hand. From SurveyMonkey for creating surveys to Google Docs for collaborative data collection, use online tools to assist in data collection.

Google Analytics can provide lots of useful insights for your digital libraries. There are both free and paid versions.

readRead!
Bragg, Molly, Chapman, Joyce, DeRidder, Jody, Johnston, Rita, Junus, Rantis, Kyrillidou, Martha & Stedfeld, Eric (2015). Best Practices for Google Analytics in Digital Libraries. Digital Library Federation.

try itTry It!
Work your way through Wellcome Library's Mindcraft project. At the very end, notice the link to a questionnaire they developed. Work your way through their questions. Think about how they might use the feedback.

Standards

A wide range of standards can be applied to digital library environments. It’s useful to complete self-assessments against the standards to ensure that practices reflect the latest standards.

Bernadette Houghton (2015) notes that

“there has been significant progress made to develop tools and standards to preserve digital media, particularly in the context of institutional repositories. The most widely accepted standard thus far is the Trustworthy Repositories Audit and Certification: Criteria and Checklist (TRAC), which evolved into ISO 16363-2012.”

Houghton was interested in how Deakin University Library would stack up against these standards, so she undertook a self-assessment. Although time-consuming, she highly recommends this approach to ensure that repository publications are safe.

readRead!
Read Houghton, Bernadette (March/April 2015). Trustworthiness: self-assessment of an institutional repository against ISO 16363-2012. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

Digital Library Evaluation

excellence

Evaluation involves making judgments about quality based on criteria and evidence. It's useful to have others look at your digital library and collections to determine whether the library is meeting it's goals.

Fox and others (2011b) define quality as

"the parameters that can be used to characterize and evaluate the content and behavior of a Digital Library. Quality can be associated not only with each class of content or functionality but also with specific information objects or services. Some of these parameters are objective in nature and can be measured automatically, whereas others are subjective in nature and can only be measured through user evaluations (e.g. focus groups)."

Fox (2011a) identified quality dimensions for digital libraries.
Click the image below for a larger view.

evaluation

readRead!
Read Zhang, Y. (2010). Developing a holistic model for digital library evaluation. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 61: 88–110.

Marketing Digital Libraries

Do your library users know you exist? Half the battle is making your digital library visible to users so it can be used.

videoWatch!
Skim the video Promoting Use from the Public Library Partnerships Project curriculum.
Think about the most effective way to market your digital collections.

readRead!
Read Das, P. (2013). Promoting Online Databases/Electronic Resources: A Practical Experience. World Digital Libraries, 6(1), 37-48.

Hicks, Alison (2013). Digital marketing in an outreach context. In A. Mackenzie & L., Mastering Digital Librarianship: Strategy, Networking and Discovery in Academic Libraries. Facet Publishing, UK.

Schrier, Robert (May/June 2012). Digital librarianship & social media: the digital library as conversation facilitator. D-Lib Magazine, 17(7/8). Available online.

For lots of marketing ideas, go to my Marketing For Libraries course.

devices

The Impact of Digital Libraries

read statsKostkova and Madle (2013) studies the impact of medical digital libraries in terms of "impact on their community, technology, services, and content". They found that the National Resource of Infection Control NRIC digital library was popular and easy-to-use. It had a positive impact on user knowledge. Their evaluation framework could be adapted to determine the impact of other digital libraries. The Impact-ED criteria they used to develop their evaluation tools includes (Kostkova & Madle, 2013, 80):

  1. Community:
    1. How the digital library is used in the work setting and what are the reasons for use
    2. The suitability of the work environment for integrating the digital library into work practice e.g. access to the Internet
    3. Acceptability of the digital library by employers/ colleagues i.e. support given for using the digital library in work time and space
    4. Awareness of the digital library in the target community, not just those who use it already
    5. Basic demographic information of users
  2. Services:
    1. User satisfaction with the digital library and how it meets user needs
    2. Preferred resources/services already offered by the digital library
    3. Awareness of current digital library services and content to existing users
    4. Gaps in provision
  3. Technology:
    1. Basic web access log statistics
    2. Usability of the digital library
    3. Search query analysis i.e. how are people searching the digital library, for what topics/parameters and are they finding what they are looking for
    4. Navigation pathway analysis to identify how users are navigating the digital library and what services are commonly used
  4. Content:
    1. Knowledge and attitude changes as a result of using the digital library e.g. actual or self-reported
    2. The impact of using the digital library on user work e.g. clinical decision-making and patient care, use in creating documents such as policies, guidelines or coursework
    3. The dissemination of information found in the digital library to others

readRead!
Read Kostkova, P., & Madle, G. (2013). What impact do healthcare digital libraries have? An evaluation of national resource of infection control at the point of care using the Impact-ED framework. International Journal On Digital Libraries,13(2), 77-90.

readRead!
Read Sinn, D. (2012). Impact of digital archival collections on historical research. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 63: 1521–1537.

Outsourcing

Do you have lots of ideas and resources, but not time? Consider options for outsourcing. Browse Outsourcing Resources.

Resources

Atkins, Winston, Goethals, Andrea, Kussmann, Carol, Phillips, Meg, Vardigan, Mary (December 2013). Staffing for Effective Digital Preservation. An NDSA Report. Available online.

Conrad, Lettie Y. & Leonard, Elisabeth (2015). Improving the discoverability of scholarly content: academic library priorities and perspectives. SAGE Publications. Available online.

Corrado, Edward M. & Moulaison, Healther Lea (2014). Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, and Museums. Rowman & Littlefield.

DeRidder, Jody & Chapman, Joyce (May/June 2015). A community effort to develop best practices in digital library assessment. D-Lib Magazine. Available online.

Fox, Edward A. (2011a). Guidelines and Resources for Teaching Digital Libraries. JCDL 2011 Tutorial. PowerPoint Presentation. Available: Google Docs.

Fox, Edward A., Yang, Seungwon, Ewers, John, Wildemuth, Barbara, Pomerantz, Jeffrey P., Oh, Sanghee (2011b). 1-a (10-c): Digital Library Curriculum Development Module. Collaborative Research: Curriculum Development: Digital Libraries. Available: http://curric.dlib.vt.edu/modDev/modules/DL_1-a_2011-05-11.pdf

Houghton, Bernadette (March/April 2015). Trustworthiness: self-assessment of an institutional repository against ISO 16363-2012. D-Lib Magazine, 21(3/4). Available online.

King, David Lee (2012). Running the Digital Branch : Guidelines for Operating the Library Website. Chicago, IL, USA: American Library Association. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Menelsson, Dalia, Falk, Edith, & Oliver, Amalya L. (2014). The Albert Einstein digitization project: hidden treasures. In J. Chang, W. Zhang and I. Alon (eds.), Library Hi Tech, Volume 32 : Structuring the digital domain. Bradford, GBR: Emerald Insigh, 318-335. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

O’Brien, Patrick & Arlitsch, Kenning (May 2015). Getting Found: SEO Cookbook. Council on Library and Information Resources. Available online.

Reitz, Joan M. (2014). Online Dictionary for Library and Information Science. Libraries Unlimited. Available: http://www.abc-clio.com/ODLIS/odlis_a.aspx.

Schrier, Robert (May/June 2012). Digital librarianship & social media: the digital library as conversation facilitator. D-Lib Magazine, 17(7/8). Available online.

Snijder, Ronald (July/August 2015). Evaluating the impact of the FWF-E-Book-library collection in the OAPEN library: an analysis of the 2014 download data. D-Lib Magazine, 21(7/8). Available online.

Teruggi, Daniel (2010). Who are the users of digital libraries? What do they expect and want? The Europeana experience. In I. Verheul, A. Tammaro and S. Witt (eds.). Digital Library Futures : User Perspectives and Institutional Strategies, Volume 146. Berlin, DEU: Walter de Gruyter. ProQuest ebrary. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

Webb, Heidi J. (October 1, 2014). Managing e-resources: did you choose your stuff or did it choose you? Computers in Libraries, 34(8), 16-20.

Weiss, Andrew (2013). Collaborating on Digital Projects. In, J. Monson, LITA Guide: Jump-Start Your Career as a Digital Librarian, 181-195. American Library Association. Available as an ebook through IUPUI.

West, Jessmyn (May/June 2015). Counting the Right Thing. Computers in Libraries, 35(5), 27-31.


| eduscapes | IUPUI Online Courses | About Us | Contact Us | © 2015-2017 Annette Lamb

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.