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Course Materials: Course Guide

From educational software to informational websites, a wide range of electronic materials are available for children and young adults. These materials can help parents entertain and motivate, assist teachers in meeting the individual learning needs of children, and provide young people with positive experiences that promote life-long learning.

Course Mission

Billions of dollars have been spent to provide access to electronic materials for school and public libraries. Some people view this support as an essential move in addressing the mission of libraries to provide a broad range of informational services to the community. Others see the spending as a waste of money.

Persuading everyone from lawmakers and corporate executives to factory workers and other tax payers will take more than just talk. To convince skeptics that their money is being well-spent, it's essential to provide them with exemplary models of the positive impact of quality electronic materials. In addition, naysayers need to hear persuasive arguments that will "shake up" their stereotypical views of libraries and help them see how electronic materials are reshaping our library landscapes.

Your mission in this course is to develop exemplary models (Sparks and Projects) that reflect the positive impact of electronic materials on children and young adults.

At the end of the course (Spark 8), you must develop an article that contains a convincing argument that will address the concerns of skeptics and naysayers. You will be responsible for submitting your argument in the form of an article that will be read by your classmates. The class will then vote on their favorite article!

Use the following guide to complete the requirements for this course.

Course Assignments

The course contains two types of assignments: Sparks and Projects.

The eight Spark activities are intended to help you explore and practice concepts related to electronic materials for youth. You will be posting your assignment in Oncourse, along with reading and reacting to the work of your peers. To be successful, complete the required readings in the particular section before trying to complete the activities in that section.

The three Projects will help you apply what you've learned to real-world library situations.

Courses Study Materials

Each person approaches the study of electronic materials in a different way depending on his or her personal and professional interests and experiences. Rather than dictating all of the required readings, this course provides flexibility by allowing you to choose areas where you'd like to explore in-depth.

try itWoven into the required online course readings, you'll find required articles indicated with a blue book icon shown on the left. Read them for the general concepts they address. You don't need to read every word of every article. However they are often useful in completing the assignments so don't skip them!

try itIn some cases, a video will be provided. Rather an a book icon, look for the blue video icon (right).

You'll also find additional resources at the bottom of each course page. It's up to you to decide whether these additional resources will be useful for your understanding. They can be very useful in identifying ideas to share in the Spark activities. Use the IUPUI Library Citation Linker for quick access to the resource articles.

try itRather than simply reading the materials on each page, be sure to TRY IT! Throughout the course readings, you'll find short activities that will help you apply the ideas you're learning. These activities aren't graded and don't need to be turned in, however they are important for your learning. They're the types of activities we would be doing in a face-to-face class. Instead, it's your job to work your way through these activities independently. Look for the Try It! icon (left) on the left in light green boxes for TRY IT! activities. Many of these activities have been woven into the formal assignments.

Course Guide

You can find the specific course readings for each week in this guide. They are also found in the course calendar along with due dates for readings and activity assignments.

Introduction

Read the Introduction page.

Introduce Yourself (0 Points, required)
Introduce yourself to the class in Oncourse.
Then, share your love (or hate) relationship with electronic materials for youth including audiobooks, e-books, websites, software, mobile apps, gaming, audio, and video.
Tell us what makes you laugh and how you like to spend your spare time (like you have spare time). Let's do something fun with this part of the introduction. Go to Wordle.net or Tagxedo. Choose the CREATE option. Type in words that describe you and your favorite things. Click GO. Use the menus to make changes. Click Save to Public Gallery. Provide the URL, a screen shot, or try embedding it on the page. Here's mine.

Complete the Introduce Yourself assignment.

Informational Materials and Starting Points

Read the Informational Materials page.

Read the Starting Points page.

Spark 1: Informational Materials (5 Points)
Complete ONE of the following options:

Spark 1.1: The Future of Libraries and Reading
Address all of the following key questions about the past, present, and future of libraries and young people:
• How have electronic materials available in libraries changed over the past few decades?
• How is the digital age impacting the reading habits of young people?
• Will we always have physical libraries? Why or why not? Provide examples, reasons, and evidence to support your perspective.
• What's the role of the virtual library? What do you see as the future of online and downloadable content for youth? How does this impact libraries?
Be sure to focus on electronic materials for young people in your discussion and examples. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least four professional articles into your discussion. Be sure to provide citations in a list of works cited. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least four specific electronic resource titles (e.g., specific websites, mobile apps, e-books, etc.) designed for children or young adults as examples in your discussion. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least three examples of library websites or Facebook pages (include the URLs) you think are doing a good job with their virtual presence. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 1.2: Electronic Devices in Libraries
Address all of the following key questions regarding the role of electronic devices and young people in libraries:
• How do electronic devices (i.e., laptops, e-book readers, audio players, tablets, smartphones, smart toys, GPS devices) impact the lives of youth?
• Do you think use of electronic devices is just getting started, in full swing, or near the end of their impact on youth?
• What role should libraries have in providing electronic devices for young people both in terms of the in-library use and the circulation of devices? Why?
• What do you see as the pros and cons of circulating electronic devices?
• How do you see electronic devices as supporting the mission of libraries?
Be sure to focus on electronic materials for young people in your discussion and examples. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least four professional articles into your discussion. Be sure to provide citations in a list of works cited. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least four different types of electronic resource devices as examples in your discussion downloading audiobooks on an iPhone or reading a YA novel on a Kindle. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least three examples of library websites or Facebook pages (include the URLs) that discuss either circulation of devices or downloading of content to personal devices. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 1.3: Research in a Digital World
Address all of the following key questions regarding how young people conduct research in a digital world:
• How are young people using technology in their personal and academic life?
• What are your concerns regarding how young people are using electronic resources in research and learning?
• Do you think young people are making the most out of what technology has to offer? Why or why not?
• What do you tell parents and teacher who wonder about the popular use of Wikipedia?
• Why is it important to understand individual differences and provide choices in youth research projects?
• How can Google Images and other alternatives to traditional searches be useful in conducting research?
• In what ways can librarians encourage more effective use of digital resources for research and learning?
• What skills do young people need to become effective users of online resources?
• How can librarians help young people bridge traditional and new technology in their work and play?
Be sure to focus on electronic materials for young people in your discussion and examples. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least four professional articles into your discussion. Be sure to provide citations in a list of works cited. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least four examples of specific electronic resources (e.g., Opposing Viewpoints database, InstaGrok search tool) youth might use in research. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least three, specific examples of library websites or Facebook pages (include the URLs) that provide assistance for children or young adults conducting research. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Complete Spark 1.

Pathfinders

Read the Pathfinder page.

Project 1: Pathfinder (20 Points)
The specific guidelines for this assignment are listed on the Pathfinder Project page.

Complete Project 1: Pathfinder.

Electronic Databases, Reference Works, and Nonfiction Resources

Special Note: Many of the electronic databases are available through the IUPUI library or through Indiana's INSPIRE service. You can access databases through both Oncourse and the IUPUI Library page. Some services provide free trials such as ProQuestGale Cengage Learning, or Alexander Street Press. You can also do a Google search for the name of the database and the word "trial" to see if a trial is available.

Read the Electronic Databases and Reference Works page.

Read the Nonfiction Resources page.

Spark 2: Reference and Nonfiction Resources (5 Points)
Complete ONE of the following options:

Spark 2.1: Social Bookmarking
Define social bookmarking and discuss ways that social bookmarking can be used in school or public library settings. (1 Point)
Create a Delicious account as well as an account on another social bookmarking website or a content curation site. Try the various features. Compare and contrast the two tools and how they might be used in libraries. (1 Point)
Pick one of these tools and bookmark at least 12 web resources on a particular topic. These websites should be useful for children or young adults to use. In other words, don't choose websites for you, teachers, or parents. Instead, they should be aimed at websites youth would use themselves. Create at least 5 different tags. Each bookmark should contain at least 3 tags. ALL bookmarks should contain a note about the contents of the website. Be sure the bookmarks are available to the public and provide the URL. (1 Point)
Discuss the use of social bookmarking in a school or public library setting. What do you see as the relationship between pathfinders and social bookmarks? How do you envision children and young adults using your social bookmarks? Provide at least three specific, topical examples. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 2.2: Electronic Databases
Pick two databases related to the same content area for children or young adults. For example, two health databases, two history databases, or two journal databases. Sign up for free trial or access them through INSPIRE or university library. Compare and contrast the two choices in terms of content, design, and technical aspects. How might they be used for student research? Would one be best for a particular audience? Be specific and incorporate screen captures into your discussion. Describe at least three searches and the results. How do the search tools compare? Is one better than the other? Why or why not? Incorporate screen captures into your discussion. (2 Point)
Now, pretend you live in a state that has been providing free access to popular databases. With recent budget woes, this service is being cut dramatically. Your school is allowed to submit a report pleading the case to keep your five favorite databases. Which five would you save and why? Provide specific examples from each database demonstrating its value for young people. Incorporate screen captures into your discussion. (2 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 2.3: Primary Sources
Explore websites that contain primary source materials. Pick three of the resources to discuss or find your own. Highlight the features of each website and discuss how they might be used by young library patrons or students in school. They can be related to a single topic or totally unrelated. Include the name of the site, the URL and a description of features for each. Incorporate screen captures into your discussion. (1 Point)
Discuss what guidance you would provide students or patrons in using this type of primary resource. Specifically, what guidelines can be used to evaluate historic photos, letters, or other documents? Create a handout, worksheet, or other materials to support use of this resource with young people. (1 Point)
Describe an activity to get children and young adults involved with an e-scrapbooking project that uses primary source materials. Think about a specific topic, theme, or subject area focus such as friendship, nature, or the Civil Rights Movement. Share your activity, lesson, guidelines, and/or promotion ideas. (1 Point)
Develop an e-scrapbooking example. This could serve as an example for young people that demonstrates what they could make. This is a flexible project, so have some fun! This should be an e-scrapbook you make, not just a PowerPoint presentation. You could include screen captures, photographs, Weebly web page, Comic Life (free trial) or PowerPoint document. Whatever best shares your results. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 2.4: Nonfiction Resources
Select a topic of children or young adult interest (e.g., dinosaurs, Africa, weather, health and fitness) and explore electronic databases, mobile apps, and websites related to that topic.
Write an article that could be published in a specific popular library, teacher, or parent journal featuring an introduction, reviews on at least eight electronic materials (e.g., database, mobile app, software, website) that might be used by children or young adults, and a conclusion. (1 Point)
Be sure your reviews are descriptive and provide lots of examples. (1 Point)
Incorporate screen shots or other visuals related to the electronic materials. (1 Point)
In addition to the article, provide a brief introduction that describes a "real world" journal that you think might publish your article and why you think they might be interested in publishing your article. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Complete Spark 2.

Fiction Resources, E-Books, and Transmedia Storytelling

Read the Fiction Resources page.

Read the E-Books page.

Read the Transmedia Storytelling page.

Spark 3: Electronic Reading (5 Points)
Complete ONE of the following options:

Spark 3.1: The Audiobook Experience

Listen to at least one audiobook for children or young adults. Then, sample at least four others. Use a variety of authors, narrators, and publishers. Samples can be found at publisher websites and at Amazon. Also, try your public library or free services like LibriVox.
Provide a complete citation for each book (at least 5 total), a brief summary, and a critical review that includes references to the audio aspects. (1 Point)
Discuss the pros and cons of audiobooks for young people. (1 Point)
How would you persuade a parent or teacher who thinks that audiobooks aren't "real" reading to recommend them for youth? Use very specific examples. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least 2 professional articles into your discussion. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 3.2: The E-book Experience

Read at least one e-book for children or young adults. If you choose picture books, you need to read 3. Then, sample at least four others. Use a variety of authors and publishers. Samples can be found at publisher websites and at Amazon. You may read an e-book reader, tablet, or laptop. Whatever works best for you. Remember, your library may Overdrive, Tumblebook or other subscription services you can try.
Provide a complete citation for each book (at least 5 total), a brief summary, and a critical review that includes references to the e-book reading aspects. (1 Point)
Discuss the pros and cons of e-books for young people. (1 Point)
How would you persuade a parent or teacher who thinks that e-books aren't "real" reading to recommend them for youth? Use very specific examples. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least 2 professional articles into your discussion. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 3.3: The Enhanced and Transmedia Experience
Explore the options for an enhanced reading experience. Publishers such as HarperCollins produce enhanced e-books, Oceanhouse Media and Ruckus produce interactive book apps, Penguin Group produce interactive novels like Chopsticks, Apple iTunes: Books provides access to many types of book apps, and Patrick Carman is known for his transmedia works like Skeleton Creek that combine text and video. There are also lots of examples of online stories such as Storyline Online and Starfall.
Provide a complete citation for each book (at least 5 total), a brief summary, and a critical review that includes references to the enhanced or transmedia aspects. They should come from different categories. In other words, don't choose all Oceanhouse Media apps. (1 Point)
Discuss the pros and cons of these interactive reading experiences for young people. (1 Point)
How would you persuade a parent or teacher who thinks that these experiences aren't "real" reading to recommend them for youth? Use very specific examples. (1 Point)
Incorporate at least 2 professional articles into your discussion. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Complete Spark 3.

Project 2: Tutorial or Transmedia (20 Points, required)
The specific guidelines for this assignment are listed on the Tutorial or Transmedia Project page.

Complete Project 2:Tutorial or Transmedia.

Instructional Materials, Web-based Activities, Projects, and WebQuests

Read the Instructional Materials page.

Read the Web-based Activities, Projects, and WebQuests page.

Spark 4: Learning Resources (5 Points)
Complete ONE of the following options:

Spark 4.1: Collaborative Projects
Explore, summarize, and review at least four online, collaborative projects such as Journey North, CIESE, or Iditarod project. Include images from their websites or screen captures in your reviews (can be submitted on your website or as a separate document). (2 Point)
Identify an online project you think would be fun to join or adapt. Think about how it might be implemented in a public library or school setting.
Pretend that you're actually going to implement this project. Create a web page (e.g., Googlesites, Weebly, WordPress) that would be used to provide an introduction to the project, timeline, activities, and marketing to encourage youth to participate. Be sure to include engaging visual elements. Although you don't need to actually to implement the project, the website should be geared for real participants in the real project (not your professor and the class). (2 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 4.2: Pairs Interactives with Books

Interactives are a great way to engage learners across the curriculum. Your job is to select an interactive and pair it with off-computer reading experiences. For instance, what American Revolution era books could you pair with the US Mission interactive? Or, what art books could you pair with the Hands On Crafts interactives? It's fine to use interactive websites or apps for this activity.
Select three interactive websites or apps on completely different topics (e.g., history, art, science). For each of these interactives, identify at least three related books for children or young adults. (1 Point)
Provide a complete citation for each interactive and each book. Also, provide a short summary and review. Be sure to note how you see the books connecting to the interactives. (1 Point)
Include screen captures and book covers in your interactive-book sets. (1 Point)
This assignment should be shared on a web page (e.g., Googlesites, Weebly, WordPress) with active links to the resources. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 4.3: Homework Helpers
A growing number of apps are designed to help youth learn and practice new skills. Build a "homework helper" web page that includes at least four recommended apps in three different content areas. For instance, you might provide a set of apps for Spanish language learning, geometry, and geography.
Provide a complete citation for each app, a brief summary, and a critical review that includes any special features in the program. Include screen captures, app icons, or other visuals that represent the software. Be sure to include an active link to each app. (3 Point)
This assignment should be shared on a web page (e.g., Googlesites, Weebly, WordPress) with active links to the resources. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Complete Spark 4.

Creativity Tools

Read the Creativity Tools page.

Spark 5: Creativity Tools (5 Points)
Complete ONE of the following options:

Spark 5.1: Creativity Tools for Kids
Try TWO of the many creativity tools for children and young adults. Try downloading free software such as the LEGO Digital Designer. Try downloading a trial version from one of the following resources: Image Blender, Media Blender, SimplyVR, or VideoBlender (Tech4Learning Trials), Inspiration, Kidspiration, or InspireData (Free 30 Day Trial), or Fablevision's creativity software. Or download a trial from another website. Try some of the features. Be sure to consider open source software such as Audacity and TuxPaint as an option. 
For each of your two projects, share your experience. Provide a complete citation, description, discussion of features, critical review, and link to the sofware. (1 Point)
Discuss the effectiveness of downloading and using trial software for evaluation. (1 Point)
Include basic instructions that incorporate screen shots and a product example that you made. (1 Point)
Compare the two software programs. Which would you recommend, for whom, and why. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 5.2: App Toolkit
Create a "toolkit" of recommended tool apps for young people that includes at least four recommended apps in EACH of three different areas. This is a total of a DOZEN apps. For instance, you might provide a set of apps for writing, imaging, and calculating.
Provide a complete citation for each app, a brief summary, and a critical review that includes any special features in the program. Include screen captures, app icons, or other visuals that represent the software. Be sure to include an active link to each app. (4 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 5.3: Beyond the Basics

Select a creativity tool you've used before or have always wanted to learn. Explore the features in-depth.
Pick one software package or app to explore such as Print Shop, Inspiration, or PowerPoint.
Pick one online tool such as Voki, Prezi or Glogster. You might try Google Docs (word processing, spreadsheet, presentation tool) and explore some of the sharing and publishing features.
For each of the two packages, learn to use AT LEAST FOUR features you've never tried before. For example, you might record your voice in Voki, import a photo into Inspiration, or animate a graphic in PowerPoint.
Share your experiences. Describe the software, special features learned, and use with young people. (1 Point)
Discuss how these features could be used with children or young adults. (1 Point)
Include directions for using the four special features you explored. (1 Point)
Attach or link to a product example you made to your posting. Or, attach screen shot(s) from the product. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 5.4: Fun with Comics
Comics and graphic novels are very popular. Youth enjoy making their own. See examples on the ScrapComics page.
Explore a software tool or app for making comics such as Comic Life (BEST CHOICE, download a trial for Mac or Windows). Also, explore an online tool for making comics such as MakeBeliefsComicx or Scholastic Graphix Comic Builder.
Using both a software/app tool AND an online tool, build your own comic examples. Use the EXPORT option to share your comic as a JPG, PDF, or HTML document. (1 Point)
Describe the features of the tool, a complete citation, and a link to the software. (1 Point)
Discuss how you could use comics and graphic novels along with this software with young people. (1 Point)
Create a plan for a comic-based public library program for youth, an afterschool program idea for school, or a curriculum-based lesson idea. Include at least three examples of comics, web-comics, or graphic novels that you could pair with the comic making activity. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Complete Spark 5.

Collections: Games, Images, Audio, and Video & Marketing

Read the Game Collections page.

Read the Image Collections page.

Read the Audio Collections page.

Read the Video Collections page.

Read the Marketing Materials page.

Spark 6: Marketing Electronic Collections (5 Points)
Choose ONE of the following types of collections: Game, Image, Audio, or Video.
Choose to focus on either a children's collection or a teen collection.
Provide an in-depth introduction to your collection type incorporating at least two professional articles. (1 Point)
Create an annotated list of at least 8 resources (e.g., digital collections, apps, YouTube channels, subscription services) you would recommend. For each item, include a complete citation, technical specs/URL, a critical review, a screen shot or example, and a discussion of why it's appropriate for a children's or teen's collection. (1 Point)
Choose a catchy theme and design a library promotion that incorporate your collection. Develop a professional, attractive, one-page handout that would help young people effectively locate materials in your category. Save as a PDF file. <OR > Attach a visually pleasing handout, letter, sign, brochure, or other material that might go with your promotion. If you use Microsoft Publisher, you MUST convert the document to a PDF file so others can view it. A few examples include Games for Preschool, Image Resources (1, 2, 3), FreeGal Flier, Holocaust Videos, Geography Videos (1 Point)
Design a physical display promoting your collection. Thank about how you can entice your face-to-face library users into using your electronic materials. It's fine to include a laptop or other media as part of your display to access electronic materials. Attach a digital photo of your display. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Post your assignment in the appropriate area:
Spark 6.1: Game Collections
Spark 6.2: Image Collections
Spark 6.3: Audio Collections
Spark 6.4: Video Collections

Complete Spark 6.

Collection Development and Management

Read the Collection Development page.

Read the Management Issues page.

Spark 7: Collection Administration (5 Points, required)
Complete ONE of the following options:

Spark 7.1: MARC Records and Library Automation Systems
Compare three different sources for locating MARC records including Library of Congress and WorldCat. Also, explore other sources for MARC records for electronic materials. Use an audiobook or e-book in your comparison. How does each source present their results? How are they alike and different? (1 Point)
Compare the MARC records of a print book with either an audiobook or e-book. Include MARC records or screen captures of your results. (1 Point)
Compare MARC records for two different electronic material types such as an audiobook, e-book, software on CD, DVD, or mobile app. Include MARC records or screen captures of your results. How do they compare? (1 Point)
Explore the library automation system in a school or public library. Learn about how it deals with electronic software, websites, and other non-print materials. Explore ways that you could better use the system to meet today's needs. Can you catalog a website? Why and how? How could you incorporate useful websites into the notes field or other fields? If your students created MP3 audio book reviews could you upload them to your server and link them to the books in your catalog? How? Can young people access your catalog from outside your library? Are all electronic materials available on your system? Why or why not? (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 7.2: Electronic Materials Evaluation and Processing
Discuss how a collection development policy should be revised to incorporate electronic materials. (1 Point)
Create a list of at least a dozen ideas for purchasing and processing electronic materials such as computer software, electronic toys, mobile apps, and other technologies. (1 Point)
Evaluate a piece of computer software or website using two different evaluation checklists. Compare your results. If possible, find a professional or web-based review. Discuss the problems with using evaluation tools. (1 Point)
Discuss the purchasing options related to a software package. For example, does the package provide grouped software pricing, special buys, school or lab packs, networking, site licensing, trials, and/or web access? Where can it be purchased? Are are the issues in terms of updating software? (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 7.3: Acceptable Use Policies and Filtering Issues

Select two different acceptable use policies. Compare and contrast their features. Focus on the needs of young people. Do the documents have a positive or negative tone? What would be change or add to enhance the documents? Share your findings. Provide the URLs of each policy (or provide the policies as attachments). Provide a comparison and discuss recommendations specifically focuses on the needs of young people. (2 Points)
Read AASL Filtering Supplement (PDF) and other resources on filtering in school and public libraries. Take a stand. Discuss your perspective on filtering tools in school libraries OR public libraries. Support these statements with at least 2 professional resources. Let's say your board has decided to require a filtering system on your Internet access for children. Make a comparison of the popular choices. Be specific. Which would you select and why? (2 Points)
Share your perspective. Support your position with examples. Cite professional sources. Share your findings including your comparisons and conclusions.
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 7.4: In-Depth Issues Article
Choose an issue of concern related to electronic materials collections for children and young adults (i.e., acceptable use, intellectual freedom, copyright, citing sources, plagiarism, remote access, open access software).
Discuss the issue indepth in an article worthy of professional publication. (2 Point)
Provide lots of examples and clearly state your position. (1 Point)
Cite at least FIVE articles on the topic. Be sure to provide complete citations. (1 Point)
Provide at least one high-quality reply to a classmate. (1 Point)

Spark 7.5: Revisit a Spark
Now that you've seen the work of your peers throughout the semester, challenge yourself to go beyond the basics. Go back through the Sparks and choose one that you didn't have the chance to do earlier.

Complete Spark 7.

Project 3: WebQuest: (20 Points, required)
The specific guidelines for this assignment are listed on the WebQuest Project page.

Complete Project 3: WebQuest.

Spark 8: Take a Stand (5 Points, required)
This project is a short "article" the explains why electronic materials are important for children and young adults. It should LOOK like an article (i.e., attractive fonts, colors, visuals) and be something that could be printed in a local newspaper, library newsletter, school newspaper, popular magazine, etc. Keep in mind that this assignment must be powerful, yet concise. I'd suggest around 500-1000 words, but you can use more if you find it necessary to support your ideas.

The article should be written for the general public (or other educators or librarians), not just for your professor and classmates. If an "outsider" were to ask why electronic materials are an important part of today's libraries you should be able to point to some quality examples demonstrating why web resources, software, apps, audio, video, etc. are essential to today's children and young adults. What makes electronic materials different from print materials? What makes them unique in terms of added value to a library? Be VERY specific. I want examples. Not just "databases are good", but WHY, what makes them better than traditional resources? Give me an example of how a specific database might be used.

Here's another way of thinking about your project. If you were asked to "defend" the electronic materials in your library program, what would you say in an article to your library or school board?

BE SURE to incorporate YOUR projects and other resources found in the course to illustrate your points! You should cite EACH OF YOUR pathfinder, tutorial/transmedia project, and WebQuest as examples of the effective use of electronic materials. Examples should be a critical element of your paper. Also, be sure to incorporate citations from the professional readings inside or outside class.
What makes the electronic media different from traditional library resources?
What are the unique, positive elements of electronic formats?
What does the scholarly literature and research say about the use and importance of electronic materials?
How can a participatory, electronic element expand an experience?
What would be difficult or impossible using traditional library resources?
How do the materials fit with the mission of the school and/or library?
How does that approach that you took to presenting the electronic materials contribute to their effectiveness? For example, you might provide three different reading levels for the same content.
How can the electronic materials meet diverse learner or patron needs or interests?
How do the electronic materials blend with traditional materials?

Here are a few examples: 123456789101112131415, 16

Keep in mind that your project should be written more as an article and less as a "paper." In other words, it should be written for the global audience, not just for your instructor. Your project can be submitted two ways.
Option 1: Save the document as a web page and upload it to Oncourse or your own web server such as Google Sites or Weebly.
Option 2: Save the document in Microsoft Word or Publisher, convert to a PDF for easy reading, and upload it as an attachment in Oncourse.
Option 3: Save the document in Google Docs, publish the document, and share the URL.
When your project is ready to grade, be sure to double check your web link or uploaded document to be sure it works!

Explore the "Take a Stand" assignments developed by other students. If you were taking your case to a principal, library board, or other decision-makers, which example and argument would be most persuasive?
Vote on your favorite! Simply post a reply to the person you think has made the best argument.

Checklist
Arguments, multiple perspectives and layers of reasoning (1 Point)
Cited professional literature related to use of electronic materials (1 Point)
Quality examples from 3 class projects (1 Point)
Quality examples beyond own projects (1 Point)
Attractive, professional and well-organized - introduction, body, conclusion (1 Point)

Complete Spark 8.


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