It’s all Greek to Me
Ancient Greece Pathfinder
Acropolis

Introduction Ionic Column What You Will Find Ionic Column Search Strategies Ionic Column Extensions  

Websites || Databases || Search Engines || Reference Resources
Software
|| Audio/Video/Images || Books


Ionic Column Introduction

“It’s all Greek to me!” Have you ever heard someone use this popular phrase? They mean that something is unfamiliar or unknown. Despite what this phrase implies about Greek civilization we do know a lot about ancient Greece.

Ancient Greece was a fascinating place full of world-changing people. If you have been asking questions like:

Ancient Greek Coin Who were the Greek gods and heroes?
Ancient Greek CoinWhat were the first Olympic Games like?
Ancient Greek CoinWhen did democracy get started?
Ancient Greek CoinWhere did the Greeks work and play?
Ancient Greek CoinWhy did the Greeks own slaves?

Then, this is the pathfinder for you. Sit back and relax in front of a computer as you explore the electronic resources that are at your fingertips. These resources provide fast and easy access to information that you can trust. Not only will you read interesting facts, but you will experience the sights and sounds of ancient Greece too (only an electronic resource can do all that)!

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Ionic Column What You Will Find

There are so many electronic resources available today. It is often difficult to know which materials are worth spending time exploring. Sometimes we get lost in the information jungle!

This pathfinder will guide your exploration of ancient Greece. The resources in this pathfinder are intended to give you a starting point to explore the ancient Greek world. You will find information about many aspects of ancient Greek life in different electronic formats. There is something here for everyone!

The resources were chosen because they are easy to use, interesting and provide reliable information. A variety of electronic formats were selected to meet everyone's learning style. All of the materials were thoroughly examined to ensure that they will help you in your quest to learn about ancient Greece.

Who is the Pathfinder for?

This pathfinder was designed especially for fourth through eighth grade students who are studying ancient Greece. But if you are younger or older you are still welcome to use this pathfinder.

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Ionic Column Search Strategies

In addition to using the resources in this pathfinder, you may want to search for more ancient Greece information. Use your library’s catalog, a database or an Internet search engine to find more resources. When you search you will want to use keywords to help you find the best information. The following are just a few of the possible keywords you can use:

For general searches use the words: ancient Greece, ancient Greeks, ancient Greek civilization

For specific searches use the words: Greek architecture, Greek democracy, Greek mythology, Greek philosophy

For more helpful search strategies check out the Books section. If you need help finding more materials ask your school media specialist or public librarian. If you cannot go to your library remember you may call a librarian or chat with a librarian at the “Ask a Librarian” link from your library’s website.

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Temple Websites

Ancient Greece at http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ancientgreece/main_menu.shtml from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Summary: Explore the ancient Greek world at Ancient Greece. Learn about three Greek cities and how each one was unique! Check out Greek theatre and read an electronic book. Also discover what the first Olympic Games were really like. Be sure to click on the Resources link to explore original Greek texts, photographs and even a taste of ancient music.
Review:
This is a fantastic website to spark your interest in ancient Greece. It provides fun and informative activities.

Ancient Greece at http://www.mrdowling.com/701greece.html from Mr. Dowling

Summary: Why is Greece called the cradle of western civilization? Learn this and more at Ancient Greece. Discover what made Athens and Sparta two of the greatest Greek city-states. Learn how Socrates, Plato and Aristotle impacted the Greek world and beyond.
Review:
This is another good website that provides a wide range of information about ancient Greece.

Ancient Greece at http://www.ancientgreece.com/ from World News Network

Summary: Ancient Greece provides information about every aspect of ancient Greek life including art & architecture, geography, history, mythology, Olympics, people and wars. You will learn about Greek temple architecture with photographs and detailed illustrations. Explore the mythology page and examine a family tree depicting the principle Greek gods and goddesses. Review: The special strength of this website is the art & architecture and mythology information. The information is presented in unique ways that will help you grasp new ideas and concepts.

The Ancient Greek World at http://www.museum.upenn.edu/Greek_World/index2.html from the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Summary: The Ancient Greek World explores Greek land and time, daily life, religion and death, economy and more. Learn what religion and games had in common. The drop down menus will help you to find specific information of interest. Photographs of the artifacts accompany the text.
Review:
This electronic museum provides great information about ancient Greek religion and mythology.

Coming of Age in Ancient Greece at http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/coming_of_age/home.html from J. Paul Getty Trust

Summary: What was it like to be a kid in ancient Greece? Learn how children lived in ancient Greece at Coming of Age in Ancient Greece. Click on the tabs at the top of the webpage to learn about school, family, ceremonies and myths. Also learn about Greek art as you explore what life was like 2,000 years ago. Be sure to check out the games and quizzes.
Review:
Explore this website if you want to know what it would be like to be a kid in ancient Greece!

The Greeks: Crucible of Civilization at http://www.pbs.org/empires/thegreeks/htmlver/home.html from the Public Broadcasting System (PBS)

Summary: Investigate five of the greatest Greeks: Cleisthenes, Themistocles, Pericles, Aspasia and Socrates at The Greeks: Crucible of Civilization. Learn what they did to contribute to Greek society and discover their lasting impact on the world. This website also provides helpful links to information that further explains the topics. The photographs from a recent documentary film bring the Greeks to life.
Review:
This website provides in-depth information about some of the most important ancient Greek people. Explore this website if you want to know more about influential Greeks.

History for Kids: Ancient Greece at http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/greeks/ from Portland State University

Summary: History for Kids: Ancient Greece is a website just for kids. It provides information on a wide range of topics including Greek religion, government and food. There are plenty of hotlinks that define terms used on each webpage, so do not be afraid to explore unfamiliar topics. Each topic includes a bibliography of recommended books to read.
Review:
If you are especially interested in learning about Greek philosophy, government and science then this is the resource for you!

Life in Ancient Greece Reflected in the Coinage of Corinth at http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/numismatics/corinth/ from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Summary: Take a close look at a penny. What do you see on each side? These images are significant to our country’s history. In the past, societies created money that reflected their values and history too. Did you know that museums exhibit ancient Greek money? Explore Life in Ancient Greece Reflected in the Coinage of Corinth to learn about Greek money and the special symbols used to decorate them. Take an up close look at these amazing coins.
Review:
This is a fascinating website that reveals the significance of the symbols that adorn Corinthian money.

Mythweb at http://www.mythweb.com from Fleet Gazelle

Summary: Mythweb is devoted to the heroes, gods and monsters of Greek mythology. Click on the picture of a god or goddess to learn more about their role in Greek mythology. Learn about the heroes of Greek mythology including Jason, Hercules, Bellerophon, Theseus, Odysseus and Perseus. You will also discover how Greek mythology is relevant today. For example, have you ever heard the phrase “That was a Herculean task”? That is in tribute to the Greek mythological hero Hercules and his Labors.
Review:
Use this website to learn about Greek gods and heroes. If you are interested in how Greek mythology is relevant today check out this website!

Odyssey Online: Greece at http://www.carlos.emory.edu/ODYSSEY/GREECE/homepg.html from the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University, Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester and Dallas Museum of Art

Summary: Odyssey Online: Greece reveals how life today is influenced by the ancient Greek people. You may explore several areas including people, mythology, daily life, death & burial, writing and archaeology. In the daily life area you will learn interesting facts about where the Greeks lived, what they liked to do, what they ate and what they wore.
Review:
This is another good website that provides a wide range of information about ancient Greece. It is easy to navigate and provides interesting facts about life in ancient Greece.

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Columns Databases

Kids InfoBits


Kids InfoBits
at http://www.gale.com/InfoBits/ a Gale database

Summary: Kids InfoBits is a database just for kids. Its easy-to-use interface, with pictures and text, invites you to explore. The broad subject categories include animals, arts & entertainment, geography, health, history & social studies, inventions & technology, plants, people, science & math, sports, stories & literature and transportation. You may explore these categories, working your way down to more specific subcategories, or you may perform subject or advanced searches.
Review:
This is an easy database to search so go exploring! Use this database if you are an elementary or middle school student.

How to Use: The Kids InfoBits link will take you directly to the database search page. You may search this database two different ways. First, you may type keywords in the search field and click the search button. Or you may click on a picture that describes what you want to learn about. For example, to learn about Greek democracy, click the “History & Social Studies” picture. Then click the picture labeled “Government & Politics”. Read the list of topics. Select “Democracy”. The next page provides the search results. It lists all of the articles available for your topic. Notice the tabs at the top of the page. For this search there are three types of articles available including reference, magazine and newspaper articles. Select a tab and then click on an article to read.

Student Resource Center Junior
Student Resource Center Junior
at http://www.oclc.org/capcon/resources/sturescenjun.htm a Gale database

Summary: Student Resource Center Junior is a database geared to middle school students. It is easy to search just like Kids InfoBits. The broad subject areas include geography & cultures, history, literature, multimedia gallery, person and science & health. You may explore these categories, working your way down to more specific subcategories, or you may perform keyword or advanced searches.
Review:
This database is for older students. Use this database if you are a middle school student.

How to Use: The Student Resource Center Junior link will take you directly to the search page. You may search this database two different ways. First, you may enter keywords in the search field at the top of the page and then click search. Or you may click on a picture that describes what you want to learn about. For example, to learn about Socrates, click on the “Person Search” icon. Then type “Socrates” in the search field and click the search button. The next page provides the search results. It lists all of the articles available for your topic. Notice the tabs at the top of the page. For this search there are two types of articles available including magazines and journals. Select a tab and then click on an article to read.

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Pediment Search Engines
KidsClick


KidsClick!
at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/KidsClick!/ from Ramapo Catskill Library System


Summary:
KidsClick! is a search engine for kids. It searches the World Wide Web for information about your topic and generates a list of related websites. There are 15 broad subject categories. You may explore these categories, working your way down to more specific subcategories, or you may perform keyword or advanced searches.
Review:
Use this search engine to find additional information about ancient Greece after you have searched the databases.  

How to Use: The KidsClick! link will take you directly to the search page. You may search this search engine two different ways. First, you may enter keywords in the search field at the top of the page and then click search. Or you may click on a topic that describes what you want to learn about. For example, to learn about Greek mythology, click on the “Religion & Mythology”. Then click “Mythology”. The next page provides the search results. It lists all of the websites available for your topic. Select a website and click on it to read more about Greek mythology. Helpful Hint: Read the search results carefully! Not all of the websites are about Greek mythology.

Kidspace @ the Internet Public Library Kidspace @ the Internet Public Library at http://www.ipl.org/div/kidspace/ from The Regents of the University of Michigan

Summary: The Kidspace @ the Internet Public Library is a search engine for kids. The broad subject categories include reference, the world, computers/Internet, health & nutrition, reading zone, math & science, art & music and sports & recreation. You may explore these categories, working your way down to more specific subcategories, or you may perform keyword searches.
Review:
Use this search engine to find additional information about ancient Greece after you have searched the databases.

How to Use: The Kidspace @ the Internet Public Library link will take you directly to the search page. You may search this search engine two different ways. First, you may enter keywords in the search field at the top of the page and then click search. Or you may click on a topic that describes what you want to learn about. For example, to learn about ancient Greece, click on the “The World”. Then click “The Ancient World” and select “Ancient Greece”. The next page provides the search results. It lists all of the websites available for your topic. Select a website and click on it to read more about ancient Greece.  

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Remains Reference Resources

Encyclopedia of the Greek Mythology at http://www.mythweb.com/encyc/ from Fleet Gazelle

Summary: Encyclopedia of the Greek Mythology is an easy to navigate electronic encyclopedia that provides small bits of information about Greek mythology. Introduce yourself to the people and places in Greek mythology. The entries often include a photograph or illustration that may be enlarged by clicking on the image.
Review:
This is a good starting point for anyone researching Greek mythology. Use this website to learn about specific gods and heroes.

How to Use: You may search this encyclopedia two different ways. You may browse the alphabetical index or conduct a keyword search. For example, if you want to learn about Zeus you may click “Index” on the entry page. Then click the letter “z” on the alphabet bar and select “Zeus”. If you do not know how to spell a word, try skimming the index or conduct a keyword search. Click on “Search” on the entry page. Then type the word or its first few letters. Press the “return” key or the “search” button.

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Colonnade Software

Ancient Empires

Decisions, Decisions 5.0 Ancient Empires
from Tom Snyder Productions


Summary:
In Ancient Empires you will role-play the leader of a city-state and grapple with the problems ancient civilizations experienced. Ancient Empires challenges you to think like a leader of an ancient city-state. The dilemmas of ancient Greece will come alive to you!
Review:
This software is especially for 5-10 grade students, but if you are a little younger or older you will still enjoy Ancient Empires. Read about the Ancient Empires product awards.

How to Use: Ancient Empires is a great way to supplement what you are learning by reading books, articles and exploring websites. Your teacher or media specialist will teach you how to use Ancient Empires. Enjoy!

Wrath of the Gods
from Fleet Gazelle

Summary: Wrath of the Gods is an interactive adventure game. You will play the role of a prince who is on a quest to regain his birthright. Along the way you will collect objects and gathering clues. On your adventure you will meet Greek mythological figures and be submersed in the sights and sounds of ancient Greece. The backgrounds from the adventures in Wrath of the Gods are authentic locations in Greece. Have fun and good luck!
Review:
Read Wrath of the Gods Software Reviews.

How to Use: You had better know your Greek mythology before you play this interactive adventure game! In Wrath of the Gods you will quest after the Gorgon's head like Perseus and tame the Pegasus and fight the Chimaera like Bellerphon. Think like a Greek hero and you will be victorious! Use this interactive adventure game to apply your knowledge of Greek mythology.

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Greek Architecture Audio/Video/Images

Ancient Greece at http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ancientgreece/resource/index.shtml from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Summary: This webpage links to ancient Greek writing, images and sounds. Read instructions on running an Athenian household. Do you think you could manage all of the jobs? Check out the images. Click on an image to see it enlarged and read the caption that describes it. Hear a short except from the play “Elektra”. In one audio clip you will hear a man offering prayers. Can you hear what this man is asking for? You will need Real Player to hear these audio clips.
Review:
This webpage is easy to navigate and provides fascinating writing, images and sounds. Exploring these resources is a great way to experience ancient Greece.

The Greeks: Crucible of Civilization at http://www.pbs.org/empires/thegreeks/htmlver/index.html from the Public Broadcasting System (PBS)

Summary: Click “The Acropolis Experience” to explore a 3D animation of the Parthenon, the Greek temple dedicated to the goddess Athena that was built on the Acropolis. Also view the video clip that shows how the Parthenon was built. A narrator explains the building process while you watch interior and exterior view of the Parthenon. You will need the QuickTime Plug-in to view these video clips.
Review:
This is a fascinating and realistic representation of the Parthenon. Everyone should check this out!

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Greek columns Books

The media center and public library have many books about ancient Greece from which to choose. Look for books in the following sections of your library.

Children's Section
j 292 - Greek Mythology
j 938 - Ancient Greece

Adult Section
182-183 - Greek Philosophy
292 - Greek Mythology
292.08 - Greek Religion
340.538 - Ancient Greek Law
722.8 - Greek Architecture
733.3 - Greek Sculpture
938 - Ancient Greece

The following books are recommended and will help you get started in your search.

Your Travel Guide to Ancient Greece
Day, Nancy. Your Travel Guide to Ancient Greece. Minneapolis: Runestone, 2001. Call number: j 938 DAY 2001  


Summary:
What would it be like to travel back in time to ancient Greece? This travel guide provides all that you need to know to enjoy your visit. Learn about what to wear, where to stay, how to stay safe and healthy and much more. A who’s who in ancient Greece will prepare you for important introductions during your visit. Read this book to learn about daily life in ancient Greece. Explore and have fun on your journey! Read a Book Review for this book.

Ancient Greek Art
Hodge, Susie. Ancient Greek Art. Des Plaines, IL: Heinemann, 1998.
Call number: j 709.38 HOD


Summary:
Studying a society’s art can reveal a lot about the people who created it. In this book, explore ancient Greek pottery, mosaic, sculpture and architecture. Find out what inspired the Greeks to produce these great works of art. Learn how art was created and discover the signs and symbols in Greek art. Large, full color photographs bring ancient art right to your fingertips. A glossary defines unfamiliar terms. Read a Book Review for this book.

Ancient Greece
Loverance and Wood. Ancient Greece. New York: Viking, 1992.
Call number: j 938 LOV


Summary:
Are you looking for more detailed information about ancient Greece? If you answered “yes”, then you have found the right book! This book describes Greek life with four fascinating see-through scenes, photographs and maps. It thoroughly covers city-states, democracy and public life. The book describes science and philosophy, theatre, religion, mythology and more.
Review:
If you are digging deeper to learn more about a specific aspect of Greek life then this is the book for you. Read a Book Review for this book.

Women of Ancient Greece

Macdonald, Fiona. Women in Ancient Greece. New York: Bedrick, 1999. Call number: j 305.42 MAC 1999


Summary:
Just like today, women in ancient Greece were strong and independent, right? Wrong. This book reveals the often untold story of ancient Greek women. Women were tightly controlled by men and their laws. Their voices were squelched and we learn most about these women from male writers and artists. Learn about their daily life and how they were portrayed in myths and poems in this fascinating book. Read a Book Review for this book.

You Wouldn't Want to Be a Slave in Ancient Greece!

Macdonald, Fiona. You Wouldn’t Want to Be a Slave in Ancient Greece! New York: Watts, 2001. Call number: j 938 MAC 2001


Summary:
Imagine living in the most advanced society on earth and then image that it would all be impossible without slaves. Using whimsical cartoons this book reveals what life was like for Greek slaves while their masters where enjoying the good life. You will discover the kinds of backbreaking work slaves did and the conditions they endured. No wonder the Greeks accomplished so much – it was all on the backs of their slaves! Read a Book Review for this book.

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece
Sheehan, Sean. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece. Los Angeles: Getty, 2002. Call number: j 938 SHE 2002



Summary:
Follow a Greek trail! To help you find your way around the encyclopedia, there are a number of “trails” to follow. Choose a trail topic that interests you and read all about it. Each trail is identified by its own small icon. This icon will help you spot the trail entries. The entries are in alphabetical order throughout the book, so it is easy to find the ones that you want. Trails topics includes art & architecture, everyday life, ideas, gods & goddesses, legacy of Greece, myths, theatre & drama, Greece & her neighbors, religion, warfare, sport & leisure, Troy and writers.
Review:
This book is a great place to begin your research. It provides lots of information bits and is sure to hook your interest with its many photographs, diagrams and maps. Read a Book Review for this book.

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Ionic Column Extensions

Do you want to learn more about ancient Greece? Choose an extension activity to explore. The extensions are designed to guide you into a deeper understanding of a specific aspect of ancient Greece.

Extension #1
A Trip to Olympia from the BBC

Explore Olympia and the Olympic Games at the BBC website. Image you are going to the Olympic Games. Write a travel diary of your experiences. Think about these questions:

1. What is your journey to the Olympics like?
2. Are you going to the Olympic Games as a spectator, athlete or judge?
3. What are you seeing and doing each day?

Using the information from the website, image how you would tell your friends and family about what happened to you since you set out on your trip.

Extension #2
Living In Athens from the BBC

Explore the Athens and Resources sections of the BBC website. Imagine you are living in Athens. Who are you? Try writing about a day in your life. When you choose who to be think about these questions:

A Woman:
Are you married or unmarried?
Do you live in a wealthy or poor household?
How does your family earn its money?
How do you spend your time each day?

A Man:
Where do you work?
What goes on at the debates in the assembly?
Have you served in the army?

A Slave:
Are you male or female?
Are you old or young?
Who owns you - a family or are you owned by the state?
Where were you born - in Athens, somewhere else in Greece or a different country?
How did you come to be a slave?
What job do you do?

Extension #3
Greek Vacation

Take an imaginary vacation to Greece. Create a scrapbook showing your Greek vacation! Think about these questions:

1. Where is Greece? Find Greece in an atlas.
2. What is it like? Find out if any of your friends or relatives have been there. They may have photographs or postcards they could show you.
3. What kind of scenery would you see if you went there? Visit a travel agency and collect brochures about Greece.

Extension #4
Greek Architecture in the USA

Explore Architecture in ancient Greece at World News Network. Then explore your town and its buildings. Look for examples of Greek architecture. What evidence of Greek architectural influence do you see? Take digital photographs of the buildings around town. Then create a PowerPoint presentation showing your discoveries!

Extension #5
WebQuests

Complete an Ancient Greece WebQuest. Adapt or follow the procedures found at one of the following WebQuests.

1. Ancient Greece WebQuest
2. Explorations WebQuest
3. Let Me See a Piece of Greece

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This pathfinder supports Minnesota's Standards in Social Studies:

Strand: III. World History
Sub-Strand: C. Classical Civilization and World Religions 1000 BC - 600 AD
Standard: The student will describe classical civilizations in Europe and the West.
Benchmark: 1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of ancient Greek civilization, including art, politics and philosophy.
Example: 1. Architecture, sculpture, myths, dramas; free/slave labor; Greek democracy; religion and mythology


Developed by Tara Oldfield, Media Specialist
Created February 24, 2006
Last Updated March 6, 2006