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Course Materials: Course Guide

Use the following guide to complete the requirements for this course.

Course Assignments

The course contains three types of assignments: Social Media Booklist, BookBits, Projects totally 100 points.

The Social Media Booklist (10 points) provides the opportunity to begin your personal and professional book collection.

The ten BookBits (6 points each) activities help you explore and talk about concepts related to materials for youth. You will be reading and discussing books for children and young adults.

The three Theory-to-Practice Projects (10 points each) assignments will help you apply what you've learned to real-world library situations. You will be posting your assignment in Canvas, along with reading and reacting to the work of your peers. To be successful, complete the required readings related to the assignment before trying to complete the activity.

Courses Study Materials

Each person approaches the course in a different way depending on his or her personal and professional interests and experiences. Rather than dictating all of the required readings, this course provides flexibility by allowing you to choose areas where you'd like to explore in-depth.

try itWoven into the required online course readings, you'll find required articles indicated with a blue book icon shown on the left. Read them for the general concepts they address. You don't need to read every word of every article and in many cases, you'll be directed to SKIM rather than read. However they are often useful in completing the assignments so don't skip them!

try itIn some cases, a video will be provided. Rather an a book icon, look for the blue video icon (right).

You'll also find additional resources at the bottom of each course page. It's up to you to decide whether these additional resources will be useful for your understanding. They can be very useful in identifying ideas to share in the course assignments.

try itRather than simply reading the materials on each page, be sure to TRY IT! Throughout the course readings, you'll find short activities that will help you apply the ideas you're learning. These activities aren't graded and don't need to be turned in, however they are important for your learning. They're the types of activities we would be doing in a face-to-face class. Instead, it's your job to work your way through these activities independently. Look for the Try It! icon (left) on the left in light green boxes for TRY IT! activities. Many of these activities have been woven into the formal assignments.

Course Guide

You can find the specific course readings for each week in this guide. They are also found in the course calendar along with due dates for readings and activity assignments.

Introduction to Materials for Youth

Read the Introduction page and watch video.

Introduce Yourself (0 Points, required)
Introduce yourself to the class in Canvas.
Then, share at least two picture books and two chapter books/novels that you enjoyed while growing up. What are your memories of reading?

Here's mine:
I've been a librarian in a variety of settings, but I've been a college professor for many years. I enjoy reading materials for youth. I post a short review every day for Teacher Librarian Magazine. You can LIKE the page if you're a Facebook user. I also post at the Teacher Librarian Bridge blog.

As a child, I loved the Dr. Seuss Beginner Book Collection books including One Fish Two Fish, Hop on Pop, and Ten Apples Up On Top. However, I never liked The Cat in the Hat. Thing 1 and Thing 2 made me very nervous. As I grew older, I enjoyed adventures like My Side of the Mountain and Homer Price, mysteries like From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, fantasies like The Mouse and the Motorcycle, and series like Nancy Drew and the Secret Seven. My cousin and I enjoyed staying up late and reading Alfred Hitchcock stories to each other. As I grew older, I became interested in science fiction and quickly moved to adult books including the Star Trek books and nonfiction like Silent Spring.

Complete the Introduce Yourself assignment.

Social Media Booklist (10 Points)
Complete the following activity:
For fun, check out Annette Lamb's LibraryThing and GoodReads accounts. Personally, I use LibraryThing for my personal library and GoodReads as my reading log and discussion tool.

Starter Assignment. Create an account in LibraryThing or GoodReads. If you already have account, you can use it. Share your account URL with your classmates and enter at least five books for youth you've already read.

Semester Assignment. During the semester, add the books you read as well as books you'd like to read. You should add at least forty books. I'm not picky about how much information you add. It's up to you to decide how much you'd like to use this resource besides logging books.

I'll check to be certain that you've posted your profile's URL, but I won't grade this assignment until the last day of class. As long as you have completed your profile and entered the required number of books during the semester, you'll get the points.

Selection, Evaluation, Awards, and Censorship

Read the Selection page and watch video.

BookBit 1: Newbery Award (6 Points)
Read a Newbery award winning title from the list below. Participate in a small group discussion associated with your book.
• Alexander, Kwame (2014). The Crossover.
• DiCamillo, Kate (2013). Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures.
• Applegate, Katherine (2012). The One and Only Ivan.
• Gantos, Jack (2011). Dead End in Norvelt.
• Vanderpool, Clare (2010). Moon Over Manifest.

Posting. Since everyone in the group has already read the book, your posting should cause classmates to think, react, investigate, or question what they’ve read. Your posting should not retell the story. Try to look at the book from the perspective of a child or young adult reader.
A quality posting should be concise (250-500 words) (1 point).
It must weave in excerpts (with quotations) and examples directly from the text (1 point).
It must refer to at least two other books for youth (e.g., similar elements, read-alikes, etc.) (1 point).
It should also include at least one of the following elements (1 point):
- Reference a work of professional literature.
- Recommend a resource or application that helps a fellow student gain more understanding or use of the materials discussed.
- Counter something (with evidence) found in the professional literature or a statement by a fellow student.
While you may wish to discuss the work as a whole, it's also fine to focus on some aspect of a character, setting, plot, or theme.

Reply. TWO responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the book including excerpts or examples from the book. The responses should also demonstrate an understanding of a potential youth reader. At least one of your replies should take place early in the posting time to allow your peers time to react to your response. This assignment is intended to be a DISCUSSION rather than simply a posting and response (2 points).

Checklist
Posting (1 points)
Quality excerpts/examples (1 point)
Other book references (1 point)
Additional element (1 point)
Two replies (2 points)

BookBit 2: Printz Award (6 Points)
Read a Printz award winning title from the list below. Participate in a small group discussion associated with your book.
• Nelson, Jandy (2014). I'll Give You The Sun.
• Sedgwick, Marcus (2013). Midwinterblood.
• Lake, Nick (2012). In Darkness.
• Whaley, John Corey (2011). Where Things Come Back.
• Bacigalupi, Paolo (2010). Ship Breaker.

Posting.
Since everyone in the group has already read the book, your posting should cause classmates to think, react, investigate, or question what they’ve read. Your posting should not retell the story. Try to look at the book from the perspective of a child or young adult reader.
A quality posting should be concise (250-500 words) (1 point).
It must weave in excerpts (with quotations) and examples directly from the text (1 point).
It must refer to at least two other books for youth (e.g., similar elements, read-alikes, etc.) (1 point).
It should also include at least one of the following elements (1 point):
- Reference a work of professional literature.
- Recommend a resource or application that helps a fellow student gain more understanding or use of the materials discussed.
- Counter something (with evidence) found in the professional literature or a statement by a fellow student.
While you may wish to discuss the work as a whole, it's also fine to focus on some aspect of a character, setting, plot, or theme.

Reply. TWO responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the book including excerpts or examples from the book. The responses should also demonstrate an understanding of a potential youth reader. At least one of your replies should take place early in the posting time to allow your peers time to react to your response. This assignment is intended to be a DISCUSSION rather than simply a posting and response (2 points).

Checklist
Posting (1 points)
Quality excerpts/examples (1 point)
Other book references (1 point)
Additional element (1 point)
Two replies (2 points)

Complete Bookbit 1 and Bookbit 2.

Illustrators and Illustration

Read the Illustrators and Illustration page and watch video.

BookBit 3: Caldecott Award (6 Points)
It’s essential that a librarian’s personal views not impact their selection decisions. This rule becomes difficult when dealing with illustrations. Books with visuals that you find ugly or uninspiring may be exciting or stimulating for a child. All of the illustrators on this list have received the Caldecott award.

Select TWO of these illustrators: one whose illustrations draw your interest and another that you find the least appealing. Describe the techniques the illustrator used and examples from specific books to illustrate what you like (or dislike) about at the illustrations. Be sure to both show and tell. Use visuals from their books to illustrate your examples. You might also wish to cite reviews. Also, discuss the issue of personal taste in selection decisions and your perspective on what appeals to children. Create a posting for two illustrators and a reply for two illustrators.

• Floca, Brian. Illustrator of Locomotive
• Jenkins, Steve. Illustrator of What Do you Do with a Tail Like This?
• Klassen, Jon. Illustrator of This Is Not My Hat and Extra Yarn
• Nelson, Kadir. Illustrator of Henry’s Freedom Box
• Pinkney, Jerry. Illustrator of The Lion & the Mouse and Noah’s Ark
• Raschka, Chris. Illustrator of A Ball for Daisy and The Hello, Goodbye Window
• Santat, Dan. Illustrator of The Adventures of Beekle
• Seeger, Laura Vaccaro. Illustrator of Green and First the Egg
• Selznick, Brian. Illustrator of The Invention of Hugo Cabret and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins
• Wiesner, David. Illustrator of Mr. Wuffles! and Flotsam

Checklist
Like Posting (2 Points)
Dislike Posting (2 Points)
2 Quality Replies (2 Points)

Complete Bookbit 3.

Picture Books

Read the Picture Books page and watch video.

BookBit 4: Illustration and Young Readers (6 Points)
Choose ONE of the following three options:

Option 4.1: Illustrators In-depth

Analyze the work of one illustrator from the list below. Include a short biography, major issues raised by the work, media and techniques used in illustration with examples, distinctive style or changes from book to book with examples, role of illustrations in each work, and why the illustrator was chosen. Visuals must be included as examples.

Only one person per illustrator. When you’ve selected your illustrator, post the name in the forum to hold the spot. Then, reply to your posting with your assignment. You are also required to reply to a peer. If you're dying to do an illustrator not on this list, check with your instructor.

• Brown, Peter
• Carle, Eric
• Collier, Bryan
• Crews, Donald
• Ehlert, Lois
• Hoban, Tana
• Lionni, Leo
• Polacco, Patricia
• Savage, Stephen
• Say, Allen
• Sis, Peter
• Smith, Lane
• Sweet, Melissa
• Van Allsburg, Chris
• Willems, Mo
• Zelinsky, Paul O.

Checklist
In-depth analysis (3 points)
Use of examples (2 points)
Reply (1 point)

Option 4.2: Traditional and Graphic Novel Smackdown
Read both the traditional and the graphic novel/manga version of a book for youth. Provide an in-depth comparison. Discuss how text and visuals in each book impact the understanding of character, plot, setting, and themes. Provide very specific examples including visuals. Discuss how youth might react differently to each approach and what types of students might be attracted to each. Cite professional resources associated with graphic novel review and research. Incorporate at least 3 other traditional books or graphic novels into your writing that enhance your overall discussion of traditional vs graphic novels. Draw conclusions about traditional and graphic novels based on your experience. Some examples are provided. However you can use any two youth book that has a traditional and graphic novel version. If you choose a pairing not on this list, check with your instructor first.

• Bradbury, Ray. Fahenheit 451. (an adult book, but okay for this assignment)
• Garriger, Gail. Soulless.
• Clare, Cassandra. City of Bones.
• Clare, Cassandra. Clockwork Angel.
• Coelho, Paulo. The Alchemist. (an adult book, but okay for this assignment)
• Colfer, Eoin. Artemis Fowl.
• Gaiman, Neil. Coraline.
• Gaiman, Neil. The Graveyard Book.
• Garcia, Kami. Beautiful Creatures.
• L'Engle, Madeleine. A Wrinkle in Time.
• Mead, Richelle. Vampire Academy.
• Meyer, Stephenie. Twilight.
• Patterson, James. Maximum Ride manga series
• Pullman, Philip. The Golden Compass.
• Grahame-Smith, Seth. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.
• Riordan, Rick. Percy Jackson and the Olympians series.
• Tolkien, J.R.R. The Hobbit.

Checklist
In-depth analysis (2 points)
Use of examples (2 points)
Use of professional resource (1 point)
Reply (1 point)

Option 4.3: The Tale of Two Youth
Share a reading experience with two young people between age 5 and 17. They should be at least 3 years apart in age. Write about the development level of each child from a professional and personal perspective. Talk about their experiences with books and reading. Ask them about specific books they’ve enjoyed. Discuss what they think makes a good book and how they feel about reading. Summarize your findings.

Identify six potential books for each child and discuss why you think they would be developmentally appropriate for the child. Talk with each child about your choices. Which draws their interest? Read at least one book together. Older youth may read independently from the adult. Discuss the book, then write about your discussion. Talk about the experience of sharing books with youth. Compare your experience with the two children in terms of understanding each child’s development.

Checklist
Summary of findings (1 point)
Dozen book selections (2 points)
Discussion of reading experience (2 point)
Reply (1 point)

Complete Bookbit 4.

Reading and Child Development

Read the Child Development page and watch video.

Traditional Literature

Read the Traditional Literature page and watch video.

Fantasy Literature

Read the Fantasy Literature page and watch video.

BookBit 5: Fantasy Literature for Children (6 Points)
Read ONE of the following books:

• Auxier, Jonathan (2014). The Night Gardener.
• Beatty, Robert (2015). Serafina and the Black Cloak.
• Black, Holly & Clare, Cassandra (2014). The Iron Trial.
• Durham, Paul (2014). The Luck Uglies.
• Jones, Kelly (2015). Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer
• George, Kallie (2015). The Magical Animal Adoption Agency, Book 1 Clover's Luck.
• McCoola, Marika (2015). Baba Yaga's Assistant.
• Riley, James (2015). Story Thieves.

Posting. Since everyone in the group has already read the book, your posting should cause classmates to think, react, investigate, or question what they’ve read. Your posting should not retell the story. Try to look at the book from the perspective of a child or young adult reader.
A quality posting should be concise (250-500 words) (1 point).
It must weave in excerpts (with quotations) and examples directly from the text (1 point).
It must refer to at least two other books for youth (e.g., similar elements, read-alikes, etc.) (1 point).
It should also include at least one of the following elements (1 point):
- Reference a work of professional literature.
- Recommend a resource or application that helps a fellow student gain more understanding or use of the materials discussed.
- Counter something (with evidence) found in the professional literature or a statement by a fellow student.
While you may wish to discuss the work as a whole, it's also fine to focus on some aspect of a character, setting, plot, or theme.

Reply. TWO responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the book including excerpts or examples from the book. The responses should also demonstrate an understanding of a potential youth reader. At least one of your replies should take place early in the posting time to allow your peers time to react to your response. This assignment is intended to be a DISCUSSION rather than simply a posting and response (2 points).

Checklist
Posting (1 points)
Quality excerpts/examples (1 point)
Other book references (1 point)
Additional element (1 point)
Two replies (2 points)

Complete Bookbit 5.

BookBit 6: Fantasy Literature for Young Adults (6 Points)
Read ONE of the following books:

• Alpert, Mark (2015). The Six.
• Matharu, Taran (2014). The Novice.
• Harding, Frances (2015). Cuckoo Song.
• King, A.S. (2014). Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future.
• Ness, Patrick (2013). More than This.
• Smith, Andrew (2014). Grasshopper Jungle.

Posting. Since everyone in the group has already read the book, your posting should cause classmates to think, react, investigate, or question what they’ve read. Your posting should not retell the story. Try to look at the book from the perspective of a child or young adult reader.
A quality posting should be concise (250-500 words) (1 point).
It must weave in excerpts (with quotations) and examples directly from the text (1 point).
It must refer to at least two other books for youth (e.g., similar elements, read-alikes, etc.) (1 point).
It should also include at least one of the following elements (1 point):
- Reference a work of professional literature.
- Recommend a resource or application that helps a fellow student gain more understanding or use of the materials discussed.
- Counter something (with evidence) found in the professional literature or a statement by a fellow student.
While you may wish to discuss the work as a whole, it's also fine to focus on some aspect of a character, setting, plot, or theme.

Reply. TWO responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the book including excerpts or examples from the book. The responses should also demonstrate an understanding of a potential youth reader. At least one of your replies should take place early in the posting time to allow your peers time to react to your response. This assignment is intended to be a DISCUSSION rather than simply a posting and response (2 points).

Checklist
Posting (1 points)
Quality excerpts/examples (1 point)
Other book references (1 point)
Additional element (1 point)
Two replies (2 points)

Complete Bookbit 6.

Realistic Fiction Literature

Read the Realistic Fiction Literature page and watch video.

BookBit 7: Realistic Fiction Literature for Children (6 Points)
Read ONE of the following books:

• Black, Holly (2013). Doll Bones.
• Palacio, R.J. (2012). Wonder.
• Polonsky, Ami (2014). Gracefully Grayson.
• Sonnichsen, A.L. (2015). Red Butterfly.
• Stead, Rebecca (2012). Liar and Spy.
• Telgemeier, Raina (2012). Drama.
• Turnage, Sheila (2012). Three Times Lucky.

Posting. Since everyone in the group has already read the book, your posting should cause classmates to think, react, investigate, or question what they’ve read. Your posting should not retell the story. Try to look at the book from the perspective of a child or young adult reader.
A quality posting should be concise (250-500 words) (1 point).
It must weave in excerpts (with quotations) and examples directly from the text (1 point).
It must refer to at least two other books for youth (e.g., similar elements, read-alikes, etc.) (1 point).
It should also include at least one of the following elements (1 point):
- Reference a work of professional literature.
- Recommend a resource or application that helps a fellow student gain more understanding or use of the materials discussed.
- Counter something (with evidence) found in the professional literature or a statement by a fellow student.
While you may wish to discuss the work as a whole, it's also fine to focus on some aspect of a character, setting, plot, or theme.

Reply. TWO responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the book including excerpts or examples from the book. The responses should also demonstrate an understanding of a potential youth reader. At least one of your replies should take place early in the posting time to allow your peers time to react to your response. This assignment is intended to be a DISCUSSION rather than simply a posting and response (2 points).

Checklist
Posting (1 points)
Quality excerpts/examples (1 point)
Other book references (1 point)
Additional element (1 point)
Two replies (2 points)

Complete Bookbit 7.

BookBit 8: Realistic Fiction Literature for Young Adults (6 Points)
Read ONE of the following books:

• Dessen, Sarah (2015). Saint Anything.
• Myers, Walter Dean (2013). Darius & Twig.
• Sáenz, Benjamin Alire (2012). Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe.
• Shusterman, Neal (2015). Challenger Deep.
• Verdi, Jessica (2015). What You Left Behind.
• Watson, Renée (2015). This Side of Home.

Posting. Since everyone in the group has already read the book, your posting should cause classmates to think, react, investigate, or question what they’ve read. Your posting should not retell the story. Try to look at the book from the perspective of a child or young adult reader.
A quality posting should be concise (250-500 words) (1 point).
It must weave in excerpts (with quotations) and examples directly from the text (1 point).
It must refer to at least two other books for youth (e.g., similar elements, read-alikes, etc.) (1 point).
It should also include at least one of the following elements (1 point):
- Reference a work of professional literature.
- Recommend a resource or application that helps a fellow student gain more understanding or use of the materials discussed.
- Counter something (with evidence) found in the professional literature or a statement by a fellow student.
While you may wish to discuss the work as a whole, it's also fine to focus on some aspect of a character, setting, plot, or theme.

Reply. TWO responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the book including excerpts or examples from the book. The responses should also demonstrate an understanding of a potential youth reader. At least one of your replies should take place early in the posting time to allow your peers time to react to your response. This assignment is intended to be a DISCUSSION rather than simply a posting and response (2 points).

Checklist
Posting (1 points)
Quality excerpts/examples (1 point)
Other book references (1 point)
Additional element (1 point)
Two replies (2 points)

Complete Bookbit 8.

Historical Fiction Literature

Read the Historical Fiction Literature page and watch video.

BookBit 9: Historical Fiction for Youth (6 Points)
Read ONE of the following books:

• Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker (2015). The War that Saved My Life.
• Draper, Sharon M. (2015). Stella by Starlight.
• Oppel, Kenneth (2014). The Boundless.
• Rowell, Rainbow (2013). Eleanor & Park.
• Ryan, Pam Munoz (2015). Echo.
• Wein, Elizabeth (2013). Rose Under Fire.
• Yang, Gene Luen (2013). Boxers & Saints.

Posting. Since everyone in the group has already read the book, your posting should cause classmates to think, react, investigate, or question what they’ve read. Your posting should not retell the story. Try to look at the book from the perspective of a child or young adult reader.
A quality posting should be concise (250-500 words) (1 point).
It must weave in excerpts (with quotations) and examples directly from the text (1 point).
It must refer to at least two other books for youth (e.g., similar elements, read-alikes, etc.) (1 point).
It should also include at least one of the following elements (1 point):
- Reference a work of professional literature.
- Recommend a resource or application that helps a fellow student gain more understanding or use of the materials discussed.
- Counter something (with evidence) found in the professional literature or a statement by a fellow student.
While you may wish to discuss the work as a whole, it's also fine to focus on some aspect of a character, setting, plot, or theme.

Reply. TWO responses must demonstrate a thorough understanding of the book including excerpts or examples from the book. The responses should also demonstrate an understanding of a potential youth reader. At least one of your replies should take place early in the posting time to allow your peers time to react to your response. This assignment is intended to be a DISCUSSION rather than simply a posting and response (2 points).

Checklist
Posting (1 points)
Quality excerpts/examples (1 point)
Other book references (1 point)
Additional element (1 point)
Two replies (2 points)

Complete Bookbit 9.

Nonfiction and Informational Reading Literature

Read the Nonfiction and Informational Reading page and watch video.

Magazines

Read the Magazines page and watch video.

BookBit 10: Magazines (6 Points)
From the lists provided in the course readings, choose one children’s magazines and one young adult magazines to evaluate. Consider the following criteria when doing so:
• What is the subject or content of the magazine?
• How interesting is it visually? What kinds of illustrations are included?
• In terms of advertising, how much is included? What kinds of products are advertised? Who is the audience for these advertisements (if it’s a magazine for both boys and girls are the advertisements aimed at both genders as well?)?
• Who is the audience for this magazine? Boys and/or girls? What age? Would it be appropriate for a school or public library?
• What is the cost?
Please remember that I am interested in the “whys” tied to these criteria. Don’t just tell me that a magazine is appropriate for girls, but tell me why as well. Explain why you think a particular magazine is or is not appropriate for a school or public library collection. In your discussion, you should provide specific examples from at least three issues of the children’s and three issues of the young adult magazines you select. For instance rather than saying "the visuals were great". Show me an example of a visual from the magazine and discuss why you think it's visually pleasing. Or, discuss an example of a specific article that you think would be appropriate for this age group and why. If you cannot get copies of the magazines from the list provided, you are welcome to check with me for approval of alternative titles.

For some youth, magazines are the extent of their leisure reading activities. Think about ways you can expand the reading options for youth who only seem interested in magazines. Magazines can jumpstart an interest in other types of reading. Select ONE magazine that you reviewed earlier and describe a reader. Then, identify two works of fiction and two works of nonfiction that might appeal to this youth based on your knowledge of a magazine they like to read. Include a brief summary of the item, cite one professional review, and describe why a youth might like it.

Checklist
2 magazine reviews (3 points)
4 book recommendations (2 points)
1 reply (1 point)

Complete Bookbit 10.

Poetry and Short Stories

Read the Poetry and Short Stories page and watch video.

Issues and Perspectives

Read the Issues and Multiple Perspectives page and watch video.

Media, Technology, and Electronic Materials

Read the Media, Technology and Electronic Materials page and watch video.

Project 1: Tough Ones Trailers and Talks (10 Points)
It can be tough to convince youth to read poetry and diverse works. Evaluate booktrailers and booktalks on any topic and think about what makes a persuasive book video. Then, create a booktrailer AND video record a booktalk related to two tough topics. Upload both to either YouTube or Vimeo.

Both your booktrailer and your booktalk should each be 60-180 seconds long. Your booktrailer should be rich in visuals and audio. Your booktalk should be more than a talking head. It MUST include an interesting backdrop, books, props, puppets, or other elements that engage the audience.

One video needs to focus on a poetry or short story promotion focusing on a specific book, author, style (e.g., humor), or subject (e.g., animals) of book. Your job is to convince youth to read poetry or story stories. Consider any work written in verse such as Brown Girl Dreaming (2014), a memoir in verse by Jacqueline Woodson.

One video needs to focus on a work(s) in the traditional (e.g., folktales such as The Jumbies, retellings of classic tales such as Mechanica or Jack) or diversity category (e.g., international, multicultural, mental or physical challenges such as El Deafo or The Last Leaves Falling, gender, LGBTQ). Your job is to convince youth to go outside their comfort zone.

You should select a specific age span such as 9-10 year olds or 17-19 year olds for your audience. Include a short report that includes an evaluation of two booktrailers and two booktalks you evaluated and thought were great examples, discuss what makes an effective booktalk and booktrailer, citation(s) for book(s), a description of your intended audience, and selection tools (i.e., Kirkus Reviews) you used in choosing your book.

Book Trailer Examples: Esperanza Rising, Stuck in Neutral, Interrupting Chicken, Wonder, Where the Sidewalk Ends, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian, May B., His Face All Red, The Other Side, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Last Laughs

Book Talk Examples: Love that Dog, Where the Sidewalk Ends, Shiver Me Timbers: A Poetry Booktalk, The Lottery, On the Day I Died, Poem Books, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, Through the Woods, Jack Prelutsky, The Graveyard Book, Outside the Box

Checklist
Booktrailer video (4 Points)
Booktalk video (4 Points)
Evaluation and discussion (1 Point)
Reply (1 Point)

Project 2: Youth Literature LibGuide (10 Points)
LibGuides is a subscription service used by many libraries to create pathfinders. We've been given permission to use the service free for our class. A few examples of how this service can be used by librarians include Dystopian, Civil War, and Holiday books.

Use the following information to access LibGuides. Contact your instructor if you have trouble signing in.
Go to http://libraryschool.libguidescms.com/
Click the admin login in the upper right corner of the screen.
Your username is your university email address as it shows in the course roster... some people have iu, iupui, or iusb email. The username would be something like anlamb@iupui.edu
Your password is youth2015

The LIBGUIDES website provides great tutorials for building your assignment. To go directly to some help, go it http://help.springshare.com/content.php?pid=34814&sid=256703

Choose a sub-genre or focused topic related to youth materials (e.g. steampunk, World War II, autism, wordless, humor, manga) and create a libguide. The format and presentation is up to you. However, be sure to study the pathfinder section of the course for ideas.
• Provide an engaging introduction that includes visuals, excerpts, or other hooks to attract the interest of readers. It should be aimed at youth rather than adult users. Think about what attracts youth to this sub-genre or topic.
• Define the sub-genre, provide very specific examples related to the contents or structure of the style, discuss popular sub-themes, and cite at least three professional resources associated with the topic.
• Incorporate at least a dozen annotated books directly related to the sub-genre (at least half need to be your own work).
• Incorporate at least a dozen websites associated with titles, authors, or sub-genre resources
• Incorporate at least three works of related nonfiction books
• Incorporate at least two apps that could be connected (product reviews are fine)
• Incorporate at least one web interactive, game, or online tools related to the topic or an activity that could be done related to the topic. (no professional review is needed)

Each resource should contain the following information: at least one graphic (e.g. book cover, screen shot), complete citation (author, title, copyright date, publisher), summary, professional review excerpt, and your own review.

Complete the libguides profile for yourself.
Make use of the libguides tabs to separate out sections of your project.
Please do your best professional work for this project.
For ideas on how to approach a topic, review the "what makes a good..." series of articles.

Below are a few examples from past classes.
Animal Stories
Autism
Baseball
Children's Fantasy
Dragons
Escape Earth!
Fractured Fairy Tales
Greek Mythology
Holocaust
Mythology
Set in NYC
Steampunk
Swords and Sorceries
Teen Paranormal Romance
Zombies
For other examples, go to our LibGuides project page.

Checklist
Intro and description (2 point)
Annotated resources (6 points)
Professionally presented (1 point)
Reply (1 point)

Project 3: You Choose (10 Points)
Complete ONE of the following activities. No reply is necessary for this assignment.

Option 3.1: The Right Book for Each Child
Parents often lump all children’s books together and don’t realize the many different types of books (i.e., concept books, informational picture books, picture storybooks, leveled readers, beginning chapter books, good read-aloud books) for children. Think about the developmental needs of children. Let’s help teachers and parents think about these different categories and how they can serve different purposes. Include a brief explanation of your audience and the approach.

Create a product you could share with parents. It could be a Weebly website, a multiple page pamphlet, or some other approach. Be creative! The resource should help inform parents and/or teachers about books and reading. It can be general or specific. It's up to you! Be sure to include lots of examples. If you create a print document, it must be saved as a PDF file.

Checklist
Book Choices (5 points)
Professional Product (5 points)

Option 3.2: Book-Movie Tie Ins
Go to the Book-Movie Connections section for a list of movies. Read the book and watch the movie! How would you respond to a patron who asked you, “Is the book anything like the movie?” Does the movie fully represent the author’s intended message? What’s missing from the movie? Is that important? Is the movie appropriate for the book’s original audience? Please provide citations for the movie and the book you are reviewing. Provide very specific examples from the book and movie.

This should be a feature length film, not a short film produced for education that’s simply a “slide show” or animation of the book itself. If you choose a book-movie combination that you read or watched a few years ago, you need to go back and watch it again looking for details. It must be based on a children's or young adult book.

You can choose how you'd like to share your thoughts and comparisons. Think of a creative or innovative approach. For instance, you could create an infographic or do a video review. Whatever you wish. Check out a Hunger Games Piktochart,The Invention of Hugo Cabret Piktochart and Harry Potter Piktochart examples.

Checklist
Question responses (4 points)
Use of specific examples (3 points)
Professional product (3 points)

Option 3.3: Read-Alikes
Young people are often looking for books that are "like" books they are currently reading. Librarians spend a lot of time assisting youth in finding the next great book to read. It's very useful to have read-alike ideas handy.

Create a plan for organizing read-alike ideas. You might create a series of flyers with a "hot" book and a list of read-alikes. Or, you might create an infographic visualizing related book. A flowchart is a fun was to present read-alikes. Even a simple chart like the one in YALSA The Hub will work. You can use any method you wish with any authors, genres, topics, etc. you wish. The only requirement is that you need to include at least 20 books. If you use a tool such as Microsoft Publisher, be sure to save your product as a PDF.

Check out a couple examples using Pictochart: The Book Thief, Divergent, Eleanor & Park, & Miss Peregrine. Also check out the If You Like... example. A Reading Tree and Book Hangover Cure are other approaches. Check out a bi-fold approach.

A fun alternative is to make an Interactive Book Finder. Carli Worthman's Interactive Book Finder Directions. Check out the YA Historical Fiction Interactive Book Finder for an excellent example.

Checklist
Read-alike plan (3 points)
Book choices (4 points)
Professional product (3 points)

Option 3.4: Just Plain Fun
At this point in the semester, you may be running out of energy. This last option is for people who just want some reading fun. It’s fascinating to see how a child’s sense of humor including satire develops over time. What child can resist a titles like "The Day My Butt Went Psycho!" or "Diary of a Wimpy Kid"? And, how each person has a unique sense of humor. Unfortunately, some adults label humorous books like the ones listed as "inappropriate". Many have even been challenged in school and public library settings.

Read one of the following humorous or satirical books aimed at children or young adults. Compare it with another book from the list or a book of your choosing. Write about humor as it relates to books, children, and adults. Include examples from at least five books. Do a little research. How has humor changed in books over time? Share your ideas in an interesting format. Consider a visual approach. Check out an example. Consider a tool like Animoto. Consider an infographic.

Suggested books include:

• Angleberger, Tom (2010). The Strange Case of Origami Yoda.
• Applegate, Katherine (2008). Roscoe Riley Rules.
• Comics Squad: Recess! (2014).
• Doescher, Ian (2013). William Shakespeare's Star Wars.
• Oakes, Cory Putnam (2015). Dinosaur Boy.
• Pastis, Stephan (2013). Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made.
• Pilkey, Dav (1997). The Adventures of Captain Underpants.
• Pilkey, Dav (1997). The Dumb Bunnies' Collection such as The Dumb Bunnies' Easter
• Rodkey, Geoff (2015). The Tapper Twins Go to War (With Each Other)
• Grahame-Smith, Seth (2009). Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.
• Trine, Greg (2015). Willy Maykit in Space.

Checklist
Thoughts on Humor for Youth (5 point)
Book Comparison (3 points)
Humor Over Time (2 points)

Complete Projects 1-3.


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